• Hoesy Corona's Three Concurrent Solo Exhibitions reviewed by The Washington Post

    Hoesy Corona's Three Concurrent Solo Exhibitions reviewed by The Washington Post

    The Washington Post

    Art

    Artist Hoesy Corona grapples with big ideas: climate change, the migrant crisis and inequality

    Three concurrent area shows spotlight the work of the interdisciplinary Baltimore artist.

    By Kriston Capps
    Today at 10:00 a.m. EST 2/24/2022

    To find Hoesy Corona’s artwork, prepare for a journey.

    Seeing all three solo shows that are on view by the Baltimore-based artist takes a trek across the DMV, from a garden in Fairlawn to a museum in Foxhall to a garage in Arlington.

    In pieces spanning textiles, sculpture and performance, Corona imagines wanderers who travel drawn-out distances toward uncertain destinations. His art is all about journeys, so it’s fitting that his work is scattered across the city. It takes three spaces for his broader project to unfold: a message about climate, identity and status, dressed up in a fauvist fantasia of color.

    Start at the Nicholson Project, a community garden and gallery located east of the Anacostia River in D.C.’s Ward 7. The juxtaposition between color and content is the first thing that will grab viewers in the artist’s work. Bright tapestries along the windows showcase scenes from performances staged by the artist. In these images, elegant figures dressed in head-to-toe onesies and allover masks wear flowing wigs of flowers. Corona’s characters could be runway models for the French luxury house Margiela. Yet they’re saddled with carry-ons, duffels and trash bags, as if they’ve packed everything they own on their backs.

    Corona developed much of the work on view across his suite of solos as an artist-in-residence at the nonprofit Nicholson Project in the fall of 2021. The result, “Wayfaring,” includes tapestries, as well as vinyl ponchos, plus ceramic-like sculpted objects. The migrants on his textiles face away from the viewer, staring out at walls and over rivers — borders both natural and man-made.

    The artist, who identifies as queer, is of Mexican descent; folkloric motifs appear in his tapestries and ponchos. While the compositions on Corona’s “climate ponchos” especially might remind viewers of Matisse’s cutouts, they point (also) to Mexican crafts and graphic arts, even as his materials defy the traditions he references.

    “Wayfaring” is a companion exhibit to “Weathering,” on view across town — geographically and socioeconomically — at the Kreeger Museum. Here, Corona’s work occupies what used to be the museum director’s office, repurposed during lockdown as a space for showcasing local artists and curators. A DIY garden in disadvantaged Fairlawn and a Philip Johnson — designed gem in tony Foxhall: The venues couldn’t be more dissimilar.

    Corona uses this contrast to his advantage. At the Kreeger, his vase-like sculpted heads are the focus. “Plant People,” as they are known, depict environmental stewards in Corona’s fictional mythos. In another context, these heads might honor drag queens or ceremonial totems. Framed in pride of place by a window looking out over the museum grounds, they offer a clever comment on the way institutions absorb cultural artifacts, at times divorcing them from their context or message.

    Corona has it both ways with his work: His ponchos depict scenes of migration and deprivation forced by climate change, for example, while the synthetic plastics he uses to make them indicate the industrial drivers of global warming. If he’s indicting capitalism, he’s charging himself along with it.

    The artist’s third solo show adds another layer to his critique: fashion. At Friends Artspace, an art and design gallery in a custom-built garage-style space in Northern Virginia, Corona’s work is presented as collectible couture. A site-specific artwork on the garage door gives the room a pop-up feel. Archival-quality works such as “Wayfaring with Child” and “Moon Rest” (both 2021-2022) really feel like design objects here. In this white cube — style presentation, Corona’s reflections on the poor and dispossessed look ready for a jog down to the Art Basel art fair in Miami Beach.

    The pieces in Friends Artspace’s “Earth Mother Bloom” resemble those at the Nicholson Project and the Kreeger, but each show has its own distinct sensibility. In an elliptical sense, these parallel views come together as a meta-exhibition about the relationship between art and commerce. The full life cycle of artistic production as it progresses from local craft to cultural artifact to commercial commodity is available.

    The internal tensions in Corona’s work never fully resolve over these three shows. How could they? He’s grappling with big ideas, like the disparate impact of climate change, migrant movements spurred by inequality and competing impulses to promote and protect craft traditions.

    And while there is some span in the quality of execution across these works, Corona is both prolific and consistent. In one of his prototype climate ponchos at the Nicholson Project, a figure in a purple outfit laden with baggage stares at a fire in the distance. It could be Corona, making his way by walking.


    If you go:

    Weathering
    Kreeger Museum, 2401 Foxhall Rd. NW. 202-337-3050. kreegermuseum.org.

    Dates: Through March 19.

    Prices: $10 suggested donation; $8 for students, seniors and military personnel. Timed-entry passes required.

    Wayfaring
    The Nicholson Project 2310 Nicholson St. SE. thenicholsonproject.org.

    Dates: Through March 12, by appointment.

    Prices: Free.

    Earth Mother Bloom
    Friends Artspace. 2400 North Edgewood St., Arlington. friendsartspace.com.

    Dates: Through March 12, by appointment.

    Prices: Free.

  • Hoesy Corona and Stephanie Mercedes (La Valentina Podcast) awarded an Andy Warhol Foundation's Grit Fund Grant 2022

    Hoesy Corona and Stephanie Mercedes (La Valentina Podcast) awarded an Andy Warhol Foundation's Grit Fund Grant 2022

    Grit Fund Grant
    La Valentina Podcast

    Congratulations to all the Andy Warhol Foundation's Grit Fund Grant Recipients!

    -Latin(X)equis | Baltimore, $5,000- Hoesy Corona and Stephanie Mercedes
    -Baltimore Indians, $10,000- Ashley Minner, Tiffany Chavis, Stanton Lewis, Katie Lively, Dare Turner and Sean Scheidt
    -Invisible Folx, $8,000- Ephraim Nehemiah, Kairo Miles, Kenneth Something, and Jabari Lyles
    -Puppets, Masks, and Crankies: Shifting the Story, $7,000- Sheila Gaskins, Tara Cariaso, and Maura Dwyer
    -PalatePALETTE, $7,000- Krystal C. Mack, Matt Freire, Sharea Harris, Émile Joseph Weeks, and Erin Nutsugah
    -Community Weaving Studio, $7,000- Ọmọlará Williams McCallister and Najee Haynes Follins
    -Funktopia Nation, $6,000- Petula Caesar, Jonathan Gilmore, Stevanie Williams, Jermeka Warren, Ben Pierce, Myles Gilmore, Phil Thomas, Mary Ellen Mink, Stephanie Edwards aka “Safiyatou.” Tamika Peters, and Chris Ashworth
    -What The Water Gave Me/Things My Mother Taught Me, $5,000- Alexis Araminta Renee, Kirby Griffin, Nia Hampton, and Alexis Renee
    -TERRA: LAND + BODY COLLECTIVE, $5,000- Jonna McKone, Se Jong Cho, and Elena DeBold
    -HellBond: Dancing with the Spirits, $5,000- Jia Le Ling and Michael Young

    Stay tuned for in depth descriptions of the projects and how you can engage with all that they have to offer over the next year.

  • Hoesy Corona featured in The American Scholar : PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST

    Hoesy Corona featured in The American Scholar : PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST

    The American Scholar

    PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST
    Hoesy Corona
    Vestiges of Climate Migration

    By Noelani Kirschner | March 21, 2022

    Hoesy Corona wants us to think about the intersection between the climate crisis and immigration by challenging our bias about both topics. In his ongoing series, Climate Immigrants (2017–present), the Baltimore-based artist uses a combination of sculpture, performance art, and painting to evoke a colorful, choreographed dreamscape grounded in the experiences of migrants—at the U.S.-Mexico border and elsewhere. Part of the series, Climate Ponchos, was recently on view at Friends Art Space in Arlington, Virginia, where waterproof vinyl garments—which Corona calls “wearable sculptures that hint at notions of home, travel, and protection”—lined the walls. “They function almost as a warning to our current unhealthy relationship and exploitation of the earth,” he says.

    Corona’s background as a painter shines through in his Climate Ponchos, each a testament not only to his deftness with multimedia works but his ability to render complex topics into an inviting and vibrant object. The ponchos are made from waterproof vinyl and depict people as they walk through lush landscapes carrying suitcases or bags, which remind us of the decisions migrants must take before setting off thousands of miles in search of a new life. Despite the gravity of the scenes Corona portrays, his ponchos are cheery and bright. “I am drawn to the bold use of colors to contrast the more sinister aspects in the work,” he says. Whether or not audiences see Climate Ponchos in performance or in a state of stillness, Corona hopes “that we begin to expand our understanding of our shared, if brief, moment on this earth and our relationship to and treatment of one another.”

  • EARTH MOTHER BLOOM by Hoesy Corona reviewed by Washington City Paper

    EARTH MOTHER BLOOM by Hoesy Corona reviewed by Washington City Paper

    Washington City Paper

    ARTS

    Ponchos Become Colorful Canvases in Earth Mother Bloom
    Queer Mexican-American artist Hoesy Corona depicts families in migration in his latest exhibit at Arlington’s Friends Artspace.

    by ANUPMA SAHAY
    MARCH 7TH, 2022

    Earth Mother Bloom at Friends Artspace
    Hoesy Corona is used to migration—he is of Mexican descent, and moved to Baltimore after living in Mexico, Utah, and Wisconsin. The experience of moving around so much seeps into Corona’s media installations and storytelling. The queer artist centers and promotes nomadic forms of art in his work to confront the issues that come with migration and seeking refuge. In Earth Mother Bloom, Corona presents scenic, eye-catching ponchos painted with mothers and other migrants as they journey to find a home. The pieces are pops of color along the walls of the brightly lit Friends Artspace exhibition hall in Arlington. The newly designed venue provides a 360-degree experience—Corona’s designs animate the entire space. Constructed from waterproof vinyl and bordered with leather cording, the ponchos could be worn on the body, invoking a sense of security and protection so many wish for as they make perilous journeys across the world. In the painted scenes, migrants traverse nature as they seek a home. “Each poncho is a wish and a prayer for safety and flourishing,” Corona notes in his artist’s statement. His ponchos also cast light on the climate crisis, his queerness, and isolation. Taken alone, each of these themes still relate to trying to find home, safety, and belonging. In Corona’s creations, they intersect with the experience of literally being displaced from home, and being forced to look for one elsewhere. “My hope is to create otherworldly, colorful manifestations that seduce and draw in the audience closer to the work, while challenging their preconceived notions,” Corona artist’s statement continues.

    Earth Mother Bloom is on display through March 12 at Friends Artspace, 2400 N. Edgewood St., Arlington. friendsartspace.com. Free. By appointment.

  • WAYFARING by Hoesy Corona reviewed in the Washington City Paper

    WAYFARING by Hoesy Corona reviewed in the Washington City Paper

    Washington City Paper

    Hoesy Corona: Wayfaring
    by LAURA IRENE

    Mixed-media artist Hoesy Corona spent 2021 as the artist in residence at the Nicholson Project in Southeast D.C. Now his latest works—large-scale fabric prints and sculptures—are on display in the project’s solo exhibit, Wayfaring. A queer, Latinx artist of Mexican decent, Corona is known for creating “otherworldly narratives” centering marginalized peoples, according to his biography. Wayfaring keeps with this theme by focusing on anonymous people attempting to cross man-made borders, alluding to unknown threats and climate crises. As the Nicholson Project notes, viewers are asked to play the role of voyeur in Corona’s exhibit that manages to be colorful and shiny, despite its unsettled subject matter. Nestled in the glittering light, viewers see implications of the journeys many immigrants continue to face. It’s a stark reality, but displayed in compelling colors, hope is present. In “Through and Through,” a person in a purple suit carries their few belongings facing a small fire in a desolate countryside. The hope comes through in the flowers layered in the flowing hair and in the way the person stands, ready to move forward. Along with Wayfaring, the Baltimore-based artist has a companion exhibit, Weathering, on view currently at the Kreeger Museum. Through March 12, with a closing reception that day, at the Nicholson Project, 2310 Nicholson St. SE. Free.

  • Hoesy Corona highlighted in Washingtonian magazine

    Hoesy Corona highlighted in Washingtonian magazine
  • Hoesy Corona on view at The Kreeger Museum

    Hoesy Corona on view at The Kreeger Museum
  • EARTH MOTHER BLOOM by Hoesy Corona opens at FRIENDS ARTSPACE!

    EARTH MOTHER BLOOM by Hoesy Corona opens at FRIENDS ARTSPACE!

    FRIENDS ARTSPACE
    EARTH MOTHER BLOOM
    JANUARY 29 - MARCH 12
    PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE OPENING: JANUARY 29 10AM-NOON

    Friends Artspace is pleased to present Earth Mother Bloom by Mexican-born, Baltimore-based artist Hoesy Corona.

    Corona is a Queer, Latinx artist, who has been exploring climate migration and refugees in his work over the last decade.

    The intricately overlayed ponchos are cut from industrial, weatherproof vinyl and finished with leather cording woven through the edges. Their colorful scenes depict mothers and other travelers on their journeys. The ponchos have evolved from wearable sculpture and costume ephemera as part of Corona’s performances, into archival art pieces to display as an invocation for hope and protection.They are reminders of the precarious and sometimes perilous idea of home and belonging. Each poncho is a wish and a prayer for safety and flourishing.

  • Online viewing room now available for WAYFARING by Hoesy Corona at The Nicholson Project

    Online viewing room now available for WAYFARING by Hoesy Corona at The Nicholson Project

    The Nicholson Project Gallery

    The Nicholson Project is proud to present WAYFARING, a solo exhibition by Hoesy Corona. On view from January 20th through March 12th, 2022, the exhibition will debut new large-scale prints on fabric and a series of mixed media sculptures created during the artist’s residency at The Nicholson Project in 2021. In WAYFARING the audience plays the role of voyeur to unidentified people as they struggle and make their way over, across, and through desolate and imagined environments occupied by lone figures wearing colorful bodysuits, carrying suitcases, and in forward motion. The lone figures are seen crossing both natural and man-made borders against impending waterways, cliffs, edges, and walls that allude to the possibility of an unspecified threat.

    WAYFARING considers the artificiality of man-made borders and the need to reconsider how we relate to the earth in the face of manmade natural disasters. The sculptural works are part of a new series entitled The Plant People, a fictitious group of otherworldly humans who see themselves as stewards of the earth. The textile works are part of the series Climate Immigrants (2017-present)— an ongoing performance that expands upon issues of immigration by implicating everyone and not just a select group, addressing one of the most pressing topics of our time: climate-triggered immigration in relation to US-centric xenophobia. WAYFARING continues the artist’s interest in fabulating and remixing mythologies to protest our waged war on nature.

    This exhibition is a companion to Corona’s exhibition Weathering, on view at The Kreeger Museum from December 2021 through March 2022.

  • Hoesy Corona solo exhibition at The Nicholson Project Gallery 2022

    Hoesy Corona solo exhibition at The Nicholson Project Gallery 2022
  • Hoesy Corona upcoming solo presentation at The Kreeger Museum

    Hoesy Corona upcoming solo presentation at The Kreeger Museum

    KREEGER MUSEUM

    Guest Artist | Hoesy Corona

    We are honored and thrilled to present The Kreeger Museum’s Guest Artist Exhibition Program, in partnership with arts organizations across the city. This program furthers our mission by supporting and spotlighting the immense talent of visual and performing artists in our city.

    Weathering | Solo Exhibition
    December 2021 - February 2022

    In Partnership with The Nicholson Project in Washington, DC.

  • Hoesy Corona joins The Creative Alliance as resident artist

    Hoesy Corona joins The Creative Alliance as resident artist

    Creative Alliance

    ANNOUNCING OUR NEW RESIDENT ARTISTS!
    Nov 23, 2021
    We are thrilled to announce our two newest Resident Artists! Hoesy Corona and Melissa Foss join our current residents, MJ Neuberger, Murjoni Merriweather, Lendl Tellington, Charles Mason III, Jason Austin, and Claudia Cappelle. The Creative Alliance Residency Program provides a highly visible, intense, and creative environment for the production of artwork in all media. Attracting artists from around Baltimore and the nation, the program is located at The Patterson, a historic former movie theater converted into a vibrant, community-based art center, with generous workspace, modern facilities, and an atmosphere of ongoing critical feedback.

  • Hoesy Corona featured in Goethe DC exhibit alongside artist Lukas Jüliger

    Hoesy Corona featured in Goethe DC exhibit alongside artist Lukas Jüliger

    At street-level in The Corner, we will present the original drawings of Berlin-based graphic novelist and illustrator Lukas Jüliger, alongside the sculpture of Baltimore-based multimedia artist Hoesy Corona. These works are presented in the framework of the project A Window to Europe: Through Literature and Art, spearheaded by the EU National Institutes of Culture (EUNIC) cluster of Washington, DC, as well as Plain Sight Gallery.

  • Hoesy Corona + Plain Sight DC + Goethe Institut DC

    Hoesy Corona + Plain Sight DC + Goethe Institut DC
  • Hoesy Corona highlighted in The New York Social Diary

    Hoesy Corona highlighted in The New York Social Diary

    New York Social Diary

    "MOTHER DEATH LIFE MAMA" by Hoesy Corona leading the way at the Watermill Center Summer Festival. Photograph by Martyna Szczesna.

  • Hoesy Corona highlighted in The Oklahoman

    Hoesy Corona highlighted in The Oklahoman

    The Oklahoman website

    Dynamic diversity: 13 must-see highlights of Oklahoma Contemporary's 'ArtNow 2021'
    Brandy McDonnell
    Oklahoman

    From colorful vinyl ponchos that cover climate changes to abstract black-and-white paintings that call to mind the primordial era, Oklahoma Contemporary Art Center's "ArtNow 2021" runs the gamut in more ways than one.

    Organized by guest curator Helen Opper, with guest curatorial associate Liz Blood, the first "ArtNow" in Oklahoma Contemporary's new downtown Oklahoma City home features 115 works by 27 Oklahoma artists from across the state.
    ...
    1. Dressing for the climate
    In creating colorful "Climate-Ponchos," Hoesy Corona, a Mexican artist who lives in Tulsa, is addressing hot-button issues like climate change and immigration.

    "These are actually things that Hoesy sometimes puts on and has a performance in, so they're meant to really be worn. ... It's visually really arresting," said Carina Evangelista, Oklahoma Contemporary's director of curatorial affairs. "These are kind of narrative clothing because they tell stories that immigrants experience."

    Since 2016, Corona has dressed performers in the vinyl "Climate-Ponchos" to appear in an ongoing performance, installation and video series about climate-induced global migration and its effects on people of color.

  • Hoesy Corona awarded a Nicholson Project Artist Residency in DC

    Hoesy Corona awarded a Nicholson Project Artist Residency in DC

    www.thenicholsonproject.org/

    The Nicholson Project is thrilled to announce our newly selected Artists-in-Residence! Please join us in congratulating:
    \ Hoesy Corona (@hoesycorona)
    \ Kokayi (@kokayi)
    \ Taylor Johnson (@hoodsnax)
    \ Phylicia Ghee (@phyliciaghee)

    Each artist will live and work on-site at The Nicholson Project for three months, receive a monthly stipend, and work with a guest curator to develop a project as part of their residency. We would like to extend a sincere thank you to our application review committee: artists and educators Jefferson Pinder (@jeffersonpinder) and Nekisha Durrett (@nekishadurrett), Nicole Dowd (@ndowd09) Head of Cultural Programming at Today at Apple, and our Guest Curator and Executive Director of Dashboard, Oshun Layne (@Dashboard_us).

  • Hoesy Corona interview with Good Day Tulsa KTUL8 ABC

    Hoesy Corona interview with Good Day Tulsa KTUL8 ABC

    KTUL 8 ABC Video Link

    "Earthly Mirage" is a brand new art exhibition on display now
    BY HOESY CORONA
    OPEN NOW - OCTOBER 24TH
    (CLOSED MONDAYS & TUESDAYS)
    AHHA TULSA
    101 E. ARCHER ST. Tulsa, OK
    WWW.AHHATULSA.ORG

  • Hoesy Corona included in Crossroads at The Watermill Center

    Hoesy Corona included in Crossroads at The Watermill Center

    The WaterMill Center

    CROSSROADS led by
    CARRIE MAE WEEMS & ROBERT WILSON

    The Watermill Center is pleased to announce CROSSROADS: The Watermill Center’s Summer Festival, a week-long gathering exploring themes of ritual, healing, faith, and hope, led by Carrie Mae Weems, in collaboration with Robert Wilson. The festival, running from July 31 – August 8, affirms The Center’s dedication to offering artists time, space, and freedom to create while revealing artistic processes to the wider community. CROSSROADS is presented by Van Cleef & Arpels.

    FEATURING
    Kenyon Adams, Laurie Anderson, Laura Anderson Barbata, Kyle Bass, Hoesy Corona, Marcelle Davies-Lashley, Craig Harris, Nona Hendryx, Vijay Iyer, David Lang & So Percussion, Memorialize the Movement, Kimberly Nichole, Vernon Reid, Carl Hancock Rux, Paul Thek, Basil Twist, Shane Weeks

  • Sunset Moonlight by Hoesy Corona at The Walters Art Museum reviewed by BMORE ART

    Sunset Moonlight by Hoesy Corona at The Walters Art Museum reviewed by BMORE ART

    BMORE ART

    Hoesy Corona, 2021 Sondheim Finalist
    Through performance and wearable sculpture, Corona examines themes such as othering, fear of death, white supremacy, and the climate crisis

    June 16, 2021
    Words: Teri Henderson


    More than 100 small horned deities, patterned with luminous gold, red, white, and black glazes, sit on a pedestal, stacked and huddled closely together, encased in a tomblike vitrine. In his Sondheim finalist show, Hoesy Corona displays only a fraction of the 300 miniature glazed porcelain talismans from his “Scapegoat Idols” series, which he has been working on since 2017 as a form of devotional practice. I imagined Corona spending quiet moments over years manipulating the material, contemplating and creating.

    The elements, rituals, and processes embedded throughout Corona’s gallery space create their own kind of meditative experience. His corner of the Walters Art Museum for the Sondheim Finalists exhibition is otherworldly and special. I forgot about time in this realm but felt anchored by his sculpture, installation, and performance works, which the queer Latinx artist presents as a survey exhibition titled Sunset Moonlight, spanning 10 years of artistic production.

    The exhibition includes five mostly ongoing bodies of work: The Nobodies (2010-20); Mother Death Life Mama (2012-present); Scapegoats (2012-present); White Constructions (2015-present); and Climate Immigrants (2017-present). Sunset Moonlight is a sweeping, generous review of Corona’s examination of themes such as othering, fear of death, white supremacy, and the climate crisis, as well as his exploration of identities. It emphasizes his position as a queer Latinx immigrant in the predominantly white spaces that many artists of color inhabit. It is a gentle confrontation through beauty, ritual, and truth.

    Each piece selected and displayed within the walls of the Walters—an institution with its own admitted history of othering and white supremacy—reveals the evolution of an artistic practice by a multidimensional creator making multidimensional work. Sunset Moonlight is thorough and full of both visual and textual information: Wall text identifies the themes in each body of work; videos are juxtaposed with wearable-art sculptures composed of artificial flowers, animal skulls, wires, fabric, vinyl, and plastic, which the artist and collaborators have donned in past performances.

    There are two wearable sculptures on view from the performance and sculpture series Mother Death Life Mama (2012-present) which considers human mortality and our perilous connection to the Earth. I was drawn to one piece in particular: a carved wooden face painted in acrylic and adorned with a crown in shades of blue. Funeral flowers sprout from her head and cascade down her body like a wave of ritual adornment. She faces the viewer, solemnly standing next to a video where she dances. Animated in her former life, her shell is occupied by the spirit of performance. On her left, she is mirrored by another figure decorated in red; together they are two material and maternal goddesses shepherding us towards the afterlife.

    In his Climate Immigrants series (2017-present), Corona explores xenophobia, climate crisis, immigration, travel, and bodies in movement. The ongoing site-specific installation and performance consider the inevitable and impending effect of climate-induced global migration and its effect on people of color. Performers wear “climate ponchos” which are decorated with images depicting “the archetype of the traveler.” The climate ponchos from the performance are displayed alongside images and a single-channel video of the performances from 2017 to 2020. I appreciated this ephemeral exercise, seeing still and moving images realized three-dimensionally. In one scene from the video, the performers brave various elements, variegated topographies and geographies, floods, storms—and in one scene a trio dances as the world burns. They are sirens signaling our inevitable futures if humanity does not commit to a course correction.

    Each work in Sunset Moonlight employs pure, brilliant hues, and compared to the minimalism strategically displayed by other finalists, Corona’s work feels like a feast. As objects and forms, the works are sudden, ethereal, magical, and deeply true. They feel like decadent pleasures, visual cornucopias decorated with nuance and depth.

    Corona’s survey exhibition was the first opportunity I had to view his work in person. Although I had been aware of his role as a founding co-director of the nomadic art organization Labbodies, and I’d seen images of his art online, I was thrilled by the scale of these sculptures. Journeying around the works gave me a distinct feeling of being home. At different moments, I felt myself wanting to reach out and touch different materials and details, like the plastic flowers that reminded me of the ones that rested on top of my mother’s pearlescent casket. Multicolored gauze and iridescent materials from Corona’s world mirrored and spoke to a history of experiences that I have connected to in my own world.

    Sunset Moonlight, a multicolored and personified memento mori, is an expansive exhibition that covers every square inch of Corona’s available space. Although he draws upon perspectives and experiences that are specific to him, the themes he explores are universal ideas that affect every human being. Through the relics of the artist’s processes and performance, I confronted my own humanity, my own impact, my own creativity, and my own legacy, inspired by the splendor, reality, and decadence of Corona’s universe.


  • Hoesy Corona Awarded a MAP FUND GRANT 2021

    Hoesy Corona Awarded a MAP FUND GRANT 2021

    MAP FUND

    Today, MAP is honored to announce a $1.4 million investment in 55 extraordinary new projects.

    MAP does not merely steward resources into the hands of artists. MAP rethinks received ways of doing and being. We believe in the livelihood and lifeblood of artists. We believe artists make the world more vibrant, sustainable, and just, said poet and MAP Fund board member, Ama Codjoe. We are thrilled to support such an incredible group of artists, thinkers, and makers and await the ripples their work will have in our world.

    Through this year’s process, each grantee receives $20,000 in project development funds and $5,000 in general operating funds to advance their bold ideas. From Hawaii to Puerto Rico to Maine, creative teams will generate dance, music, and theater works that organize their communities around abolition, fight for environmental justice, explore practices for mutual care, and more. Please join us in championing performing artists who are transforming our world in revolutionary ways:

  • Hoesy Corona featured in Art Focus Oklahoma Summer 2021

    Hoesy Corona featured in Art Focus Oklahoma Summer 2021

    Art Focus Oklahoma

    Hoesy Corona featured in the Ekphrasis: Art & Poetry section of Art Focus Oklahoma summer 2021 which joins verse and visual art.

    Gay Pasley responds to 'Mother Scapegoats' with a beautiful and powerful verse letter.

  • Hoesy Corona on Joseph Beuys Centenary | Hirshhorn Museum + Goethe Institut

    Hoesy Corona on Joseph Beuys Centenary | Hirshhorn Museum + Goethe Institut

    Repost from @hirshhorn - Hoesy Corona is a self-described uncategorized artist whose work examines "what it means to be a queer Latinx immigrant in a place where there are few." Corona's wearable sculptures, installations, and performances explore issues that affect marginalized communities such as obfuscation, scapegoating, immigration, and fear of the other. In this video he speaks about how the work of Joseph Beuys enhanced his understanding of the artistic role that we all play in the creation of our shared reality.
    @hoesycorona #aboutbeuysDC @goethe_dc

  • Hoesy Corona interviewed by Rob Lee for Getting to the Truth in this Art Podcast

    Hoesy Corona interviewed by Rob Lee for Getting to the Truth in this Art Podcast
  • Hoesy Corona awarded the Baker Artist Awards 2021!

    Hoesy Corona awarded the Baker Artist Awards 2021!

    Baker Artist Awards 2021

    2021 Baker Artist Awardees:

    Interdisciplinary
    Rahne Alexander, ellen cherry, Hoesy Corona, Katherine Fahey, Strikeware Collective, Pamela Woolford

    Film/ Video
    Khalid Ali, Eric Cotten, Dina Fiasconaro, Chung Wei Huang, Corey Hughes, Jonna McKone

    Music
    Abdu Ali, Lura Johnson, Outcalls Band, Meng Su, Letitia VanSant, Von Vargas

    Performance
    Anna Fitzgerald, Colette Krogol, Lola B. Pierson, Glenn Ricci, Vincent Thomas, Allen Xing

    Visual Arts
    Larry Poncho Brown, Mina Cheon, Christine Neill, Ernest Shaw, René Treviño, McKinley Wallace

    Literary Arts
    Maria Adelmann, James Arthur, Kathy Flann, Elizabeth Hazen, Pat Montley

  • Hoesy Corona named a Sondheim Artscape Prize finalist

    Hoesy Corona named a Sondheim Artscape Prize finalist

    Bmore Art

    The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts (BOPA) announced the finalists for the 16th annual Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize today. The five individual artists selected as this year’s finalists are Hoesy Corona, Tsedaye Makonnen, Jonathan Monaghan, Lavar Munroe, and Hae Won Sohn. The visual art competition awards a $25,000 fellowship annually to the winner – a visual artist or collaborative group – living and working in the Greater Baltimore region.

    This year, the finalists’ work will be exhibited in person at the Walters Art Museum, on view Thursday, May 27, through Sunday, July 18, 2021. The winner of the 2021 Sondheim Artscape Prize will be announced during a special award ceremony on Saturday, July 10, 2021. Additionally, works by semifinalists not moving to the finals will be selected by BOPA curator Lou Joseph for a separate exhibition during the summer of 2021. The 2021 jurors are Naz Cuguoğlu, Michelle Grabner, and Meleko Mokgosi.

  • Hoesy Corona in conversation with The Walters Art Museum

    Hoesy Corona in conversation with The Walters Art Museum

    Walters Art Museum

    Baltimore-based uncategorized artist Hoesy Corona works in many mediums to tell stories that confront the past and the present. In conversation with artist and writer Lexie Mountain, Hoesy, a finalist for the 2020 Janet & Walters Sondheim Artscape Prize, shares his work and artistic practice. Exploring references from the Walters Art Museum’s collection, Hoesy compares the experience of the contemporary artist residency to that of the court painter.

  • Hoesy Corona included in ARTNOW 2021 at Oklahoma Contemporary

    Hoesy Corona included in ARTNOW 2021 at Oklahoma Contemporary

    Oklahoma Contemporary

    curated by Helen Opper.
    participating artists:
    Sarah Ahmad
    Rea Baldridge
    Karam Cheong
    Hoesy Corona
    Chase Earles
    Joshua Jaiye Farrell
    Edward Grady
    Raven Halfmoon
    Melissa Jacobs
    Kreg Kallenberger
    Carrie Kouts
    Sam Ladwig
    Kyle Larson
    Sarah Leis
    Kalup Linzy
    Amy Maguire
    Leigh Martin
    Simphiwe Mbunyuza
    Mandy Messina
    Nicole Moan
    Audrey Peck
    Gabriel Rojas
    Bert Seabourn
    Tyra Shackleford
    Scott Vo
    Dan Worcester
    XVALA

  • Hoesy Corona in conversation with The Walters Art Museum

    Hoesy Corona in conversation with The Walters Art Museum
  • Hoesy Corona Awarded a Municipal Arts Society of Baltimore City Artist Travel Prize 2020!

    Hoesy Corona Awarded a Municipal Arts Society of Baltimore City Artist Travel Prize 2020!

    Balimore Office and Promotion of the Arts

    The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts (BOPA) and the Municipal Art Society of Baltimore City (MASB) announce Schroeder Cherry and Hoesy Corona as recipients of the 2020 Municipal Art Society of Baltimore City Artist Travel Prize. Each artist receives $6,000. The prize is intended to function as funding for travel essential to an artist’s studio practice that an artist may not otherwise be able to afford. Cherry and Corona were selected from a highly competitive pool of applicants.

    Hoesy Corona plans to travel to Yuriria, Guanajuato, Mexico and the surrounding rural town of Tierra Blanca to inform a new body of work tentatively titled “Acts of Liberation”. The series will draw from Corona's personal experiences as a queer-Mexican-immigrant to poetically consider how immigrants thrive in a new place despite their unique circumstances.

  • Hoesy Corona included in The Washington Post

    Hoesy Corona included in The Washington Post
  • Hoesy Corona interviewed by ProArtesMexico Aqui & Alla Podcast

    Hoesy Corona interviewed by ProArtesMexico Aqui & Alla Podcast
  • Hoesy Corona interview in BmoreArt

    Hoesy Corona interview in BmoreArt

    Bmore Art Article

    Hoesy Corona, Multidisciplinary Artist
    Lives in Station North/Greenmount West
    Born in Guanajuato, Mexico, 1986
    IG: @hoesycorona
    Visit Corona’s Virtual Sondheim Exhibition

    What is the theme of your Sondheim Finalist exhibition?

    I am presenting selections from my longest ongoing series, The Nobodies, an ongoing story documenting the journeys of displaced immigrants and marginalized peoples. In The Nobodies I use sculptural garments, public performance, and poetry to create otherworldly experiences for the viewer while questioning the social constructions that govern and objectify personhood. In this series I obfuscate the body by making it into a living sculpture; the performers’ faces are usually hidden and there is no way of fully identifying them. I revel in the simultaneous visibility and invisibility that the colorful sculptural garments bring to the wearer.

    This body of work comes directly from my experiences as a young queer immigrant in the 1990s and the overwhelming feeling of being invisible and immensely visible at the same time. Invisible because I didn’t speak the language and therefore was not heard, and hypervisible because I was different, wore old clothes, and instead of a backpack I carried my supplies in a plastic bag. Fifteen years later these early experiences would translate into subtle and silent sculptural performances that privileged the “presence” of the self over a “performance” of the self. These performances make me think about the often blatant ways some Americans love to consume cultures and foods but loathe the actual culture makers.

    I started this series in 2009—[the exhibition includes selections from 2010-2020]. This series was a turning point early in my career. I was formally trained as a painter but had always been interested in a multidisciplinary approach to art-making, and through this body of work, I found the empowering realm of performance art. Working in performance art proved to be the “fuck you” to the world that I needed to break free from a disempowering mentality.

    The work came about when I was longing to reconnect to my roots, having migrated to the US at the age of 7, and while looking for answers I came across the book The Labyrinth of Solitude by Octavio Paz. In the book, Paz poetically compares and contrasts two sisters: Mexico and the United States—and as he describes a power shift between the two, he identifies Mexico as living in the shadow of her younger sister. He dedicates a passage to the act of “Nobodying,” an operation that he describes as consisting of making somebody into nobody. And as is usually the case with every book I read, it brought me to something else, in this case, the powerful poem “Los Nadies” by Eduardo Galeano which so eloquently described the ways people are devalued and dehumanized. These two texts would form the foundation for The Nobodies.

    When you applied to Sondheim it was before COVID-19 and you were prepared to exhibit your work in a museum in physical space. When you learned that the project would pivot to a virtual exhibit, how did you have to change your thinking and process? What is the impact of a digital space and medium upon your work? And conversely, can you talk about your ideal IRL exhibition scenario—what did you envision for this work and how would it be experienced differently in person?

    One of the best parts about the Sondheim Prize Finalist exhibition is the privilege of showing the work in a museum gallery. When I received the news I was a finalist, of course I was overjoyed but certainly disappointed it would be a digital presentation, because while my work presents well online, there is a certain physicality in my work that I knew would never come across in a virtual space.

    When I applied I was prepared to do a site-specific installation of my White Constructions series that would activate the entire museum gallery and allow viewers to walk through the installation. With the limitations of a virtual gallery, I opted to show performance photographs and digital collages from my series The Nobodies. I had always thought it was funny that even though I wasn’t a photographer, this particular body of work existed heavily through photographic documents. So I decided to both honor this series and also explore what a “gallery” exhibit of large-scale performance documents would look like. If I had the chance to recreate this exhibition in a museum setting I would make it into an installation by including the wearable sculptures depicted in the documents to create a more interactive and immersive space.

    It’s the 15th year of the Sondheim Prize and this seems like an opportunity to consider the impact of this prize. In your opinion, what could BOPA or Baltimore City do to enhance your experience, to maximize the impact of this prize, and to use Sondheim to elevate Baltimore’s cultural landscape? After this experience is over, what residual or archival elements would be beneficial to you and your art career?

    It has been a joy to see many local artists that I both admire and call friends to be recognized and celebrated with this fellowship over the last 14 years. Obviously this year the rollout is unlike past years so it’s hard for me to make suggestions that wouldn’t center our current limitations. For example, with a physical exhibition there were more opportunities to get press exposure—unlike this year in which the exhibits feel a bit hidden. I would like to see a nice print catalog added to the finalists’ exhibition with essays written by exciting local and national writers and distributed widely.

    This year, in lieu of documentation, one of the residual archival elements from this exhibition will have to be a short video navigating the virtual gallery. I am still hopeful that an honorary exhibition of the finalists may still take place in a museum setting when it is possible to do so.

    What is your opinion of art prizes in general?

    Art prizes come in all shapes and sizes and come with varying levels of prestige and dollar amounts that can really help transform an artist’s career. Aside from money, I think art prizes are helpful in that they require the artist to have a certain type of readiness and preparedness when it comes to having documentation and writing about the work ready to be presented to both the jurors and the public. Art prizes are also a great way to get your work in front of professionals in the art world that might be hard to reach otherwise. I think they also unintentionally help artists to think about their practice long term and to keep tabs of what work we’ve produced, where it is, what state it’s in, and generally which works we deem essential to our oeuvre.

    When I got word I was a finalist I did immediately think about the radical Turner Prize artists deciding to share the prize equally instead of appointing a winner—unfortunately, we weren’t told who the other finalists were ahead of time. When we found out about each other with only a week to go before the public virtual exhibition, I opted instead to reach out to each of the other finalists for their email addresses to send a group email to BOPA. At first seeking clarification on the unclear status of the newly added six-week residency in Italy and then advocating for the residency to still be awarded to one of the remaining finalists even if scheduled for a later date.

    What is your advice for other artists applying to and participating in art prizes?

    My advice to artists would first be to remind them that most art prizes are quite transactional—we all paid to be considered for this opportunity and to get the jurors’ eyes on our work. Because it costs dollars to be considered, make sure you represent your work in the best way possible—for the Sondheim Prize the application is actually quite simple and only requires 5 images along with some basic info. For this first part I would suggest submitting work that is intriguing and will leave the jurors wanting to see more. If selected for the second round you will be asked to submit up to 30 works; for this stage I would suggest being mindful of the order of the images/media you are submitting and to consider the “story” they tell one after the other.

  • Hoesy Corona featured in Baltimore Fishbowl

    Hoesy Corona featured in Baltimore Fishbowl
  • Hoesy Corona Art Daily

    Hoesy Corona Art Daily
  • Hoesy Corona featured in Metro Latino USA News

    Hoesy Corona featured in Metro Latino USA News

    metrolatinousa.com/2019/09/14/artistas-… metro latino usa |

    “Entre los ocho artistas se encuentra Muriel Hasbún, de origen salvadoreño y residente en Silver Spring, así como Hoesy Corona, de origen mexicano, quien reside en la ciudad de Baltimore y cuyos trabajos han sido exhibidos en diferentes museos de Estados Unidos, Francia y Grecia.”

  • Hoesy Corona included in Brightest Young Things

    Hoesy Corona included in Brightest Young Things
  • Hoesy Corona featured in The Georgetowner in Washington, DC

    Hoesy Corona featured in The Georgetowner in Washington, DC
  • Hoesy Corona included in “Recall/Respond 2” at The Gilcrease Museum Nov 2019- March 2020

    Hoesy Corona included in “Recall/Respond 2” at The Gilcrease Museum Nov 2019- March 2020

    Gilcrease Magazine

    Gilcrease Museum and Tulsa Artist Fellowship present Recall/Respond, a multi-phased contemporary arts exhibition that includes works by both current Tulsa Artist Fellows, as well as Fellowship alum. By engaging in conversation with contemporary artists, this exhibition confronts complex histories within the interdisciplinary Gilcrease collections of the art, history, and culture of greater North America.

    Part two on view Nov 2019 through March 15th 2020
    Featuring artists: Hoesy Corona, Crystal Campbell, Sarah Ahmad, Kalup Linzy, Tali Weinberg, Emily Chase, Anita Fields, Heyd Fontenot, Arigon Starr, Meghan Martin

  • Hoesy Corona included in “The Future is Now and I Am It: a Parade to Mark the Moment” curated by Carrie Mae Weems at The Kennedy Center’s The Reach (inauguration) Sept 7, 2019

    Hoesy Corona included in “The Future is Now and I Am It: a Parade to Mark the Moment” curated by Carrie Mae Weems at The Kennedy Center’s The Reach (inauguration) Sept 7, 2019

    cms.kennedy-center.org/festivals/reach/…

    Guest artists to include: Nona Hendryx, Andrew Ondrecjak, The Griggs Brothers, Marlon Taylor-Wiles, Laura Anderson Barbata, Sheldon Scott, Stephanie Mecedes, Vanessa German, Hoesy Corona, and others

    Performers to include: Lubana Al-Quntar, Hall Williams Band, Kazaxe, Ladygod, Soka Tribe, Mariachi El Rey, LeeAnet Noble & Team Vicious, Christina Piazza & Paul Bachmann, Eastern High School Drumline, and The President’s Own Marine Band

    To open the REACH, the Kennedy Center gathers artists from far-flung corners of the artistic landscape together with young people to walk, march, and dance into the future in this parade curated by multi-disciplinary visual and performance artist Carrie Mae Weems, in collaboration with David Ross’s MusicianShip and the Funk Parade.

  • Hoesy Corona selected as Performance Juror for The 2nd Tri-Annual Maryland State Artist Registry Juried Exhibition 2019

    Hoesy Corona selected as Performance Juror for The 2nd Tri-Annual Maryland State Artist Registry Juried Exhibition 2019

    Maryland Art Place - MD State Arts Council

    Juror Announcement for the 2nd Tri-Annual Maryland State Artist Registry Juried Exhibition! MAP is pleased to welcome...

    Performance Juror: HOESY CORONA

    Hoesy Corona is an uncategorized artist working across various media while considering what it means to be a queer Latinx immigrant in a place where there are few. His performance and installations confront the viewer with the most pressing issues of our time and recurring themes of queerness, race/class/gender, nature, isolation and celebration in his work. He is a recent Halcyon Arts Lab Fellow in Washington, DC and a current fellow at the Tulsa Artist Fellowship in Oklahoma. He splits his time living and working between Baltimore and Tulsa. Hoesy has shown his works in Greece, France, and in the USA. Exhibiting and performing at various institutional, private, public and underground venues including The Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Athens School of Fine Arts, and The Baltimore Museum of Art. He is the founding co-director of Labbodies, a nomadic arts organization in Baltimore since 2014. Recent honors include a Merriweather District Artist in Residence, an Andy Warhol Foundation Grit Fund Grant, and a Robert W. Deutsch Foundationʼs Rubyʼs Project Grant.

  • “Imaginary Construct” a solo presentation by Hoesy Corona at VisArts CommonGround Gallery

     “Imaginary Construct” a solo presentation by Hoesy Corona at VisArts CommonGround Gallery

    VisArts Fall 2019


    Hoesy Corona’s uncategorized works draw from his personal experiences as a queer Latinx immigrant in the United States. His works oftentimes confront and delight viewers with some of the most pressing issues of our time. Recurring themes of race/class/gender, otherness, celebration, isolation, and the climate crisis are all present throughout his work.

    Imaginary Construct is a site-responsive installation made using digital tools as well as hand cut black and white vinyl letters adhered to a clear substrate that deconstruct the word “white”. Making the invisible slightly more visible.

    Imaginary Construct is a part of the ongoing series White Constructions, begun in 2016, in which Corona considers the arbitrary and deliberate construction of race in the United States and its negative effects on black and brown people. Insisting that the hierarchy of ones racial profile in the US is not innate, or natural but is instead a deliberate social construct created by the powers-that-be in an effort to subjugate non-white people.

    Imaginary Construct reminds the viewer that language is alive, used to craft the world, and can be constructed or deconstructed at any given time to change the way we relate to each other. Imaginary Construct invites us to reconsider and reconstruct our personal, political, and national relationship to the faulty and dangerous notion of race.

  • Hoesy Corona named a finalist for The Trawick Prize 2019

    Hoesy Corona named a finalist for The Trawick Prize 2019

    Trawick Prize 2019


    Congrats to the 2019 Trawick Prize:
    Bethesda Contemporary Arts Awards Finalsits

    Stephanie Benassi
    Hoesy Corona
    Oletha DeVane
    Muriel Hasbun
    Monroe Isenberg
    Renee Rendine
    Mojdeh Rezaiepour
    Anne Clare Rogers

    Exhibition:

    Selected finalists will have their work on display September 4-28, 2019 in downtown Bethesda at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E.The Gallery is located just two blocks from the Bethesda Metro station and parking is available in the public lot on Woodmont Avenue.

    The award winners will be announced on Wednesday, September 4. The first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.

    The public opening reception will be held Friday, September 13 from 6-8pm.

    Trawick Prize Gallery Hours:
    Wednesday - Saturday, 12 - 6pm

  • Hoesy Corona featured in Mundo Latino Baltimore

    Hoesy Corona featured in Mundo Latino Baltimore
  • Hoesy Corona included in Stonewall 50 at Clifford Chance in Washington, DC

    Hoesy Corona included in Stonewall 50 at Clifford Chance in Washington, DC

    Clifford Chance, Arcus Pride Art Exhibition 2019, Washington, DC

    Stonewall 50 is Arcus Americas' thirteenth annual Pride art exhibition in the Firm's New York office and the fourth in Washington, DC.
    In the early hours of June 28, 1969, a violent police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a bar in the West Village in New York City, erupted into a series of spontaneous demonstrations by queer and trans people for their safety, survival, and right to exist. As the rebellion progressed over the course of three days, an international LGBT+ civil rights movement was born. In celebration and recognition of the 50th anniversary of Stonewall and World Pride, Stonewall 50 explores the far-reaching art and activism the uprising spawned: the artists and activists whose influence and contributions have been historically overlooked and the history of Pride, which began with the Christopher Street Liberation Day March in 1970 and has expanded city by city into a worldwide phenomenon. The exhibition includes historical and contemporary artwork that traces these histories: photographs of early Gay Pride marches and pioneering activists like Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera; works by contemporary and underrepresented historical artists who reflect on queer experience and visibility; and documentation of the increasingly intersectional focus of contemporary LGBT+ activism.

  • Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston included in the print edition of BMORE ART JOURNAL Vol 7 BODIES

    Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston included in the print edition of BMORE ART JOURNAL Vol 7 BODIES
  • Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston to lecture in the Power Speaker Series at The Maryland Institute College of Art

    Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston to lecture in the Power Speaker Series at The Maryland Institute College of Art

    Maryland Institute College of Art Power Speaker Series Events

    Date
    March 18, 2019

    Location
    Fred Lazarus IV Center
    131 W North Ave

    MFA in Community Arts hosts POWER Speaker Series: Ada Pinkston and Hoesy Corona of LabBodies

    The Five Year Itch…

    Or Collaboration Tips for How to Cook an Ethnic Meal in White Establishments.

    Join us in conversation with Ada Pinkston and Hoesy Corona of LabBodies, a performance art laboratory invested in experimentation and collaboration. They will be speaking about their combined and individual efforts founding, coordinating, and curating LabBodies, and the work that they are currently engaged in.

  • Hoesy Corona's Performance Reviewed by Washington College's The Elm

    Hoesy Corona's Performance Reviewed by Washington College's The Elm

    The Elm

    Performing Artist Interrogates Alienation
    By Jon Vitale

    Elm Staff Writer

    On March 5, campus hosted artist Hoesy Corona at Kohl Gallery in the Gibson Center for the Arts, featuring his new multimedia performance and installation, titled “Alie[N]ation”.

    The exhibit’s aim, according to the event description, was to consider “hyperbolized alien tropes, xenophobic language, and the archetype of the scapegoat in contemporary discourse.”

    The gallery was decorated with many different works of interpretative art of all different colors and styles. Most of them had the letters of the word “white” scattered around in various artistic ways. Near the rear of the gallery, there were statement posters, directly implying the message of the exhibition.

    On one end of the room, the canvas read “Whiteness is a verb,” while on the other side there were two canvases. One read “Are you alien or are you human?” and the other said “Who is considered alien in the USA and who is considered human?” These messages were the core of the exhibit. In the center of the room, one performer stood relatively still, clad in vibrant, multicolor fabric, which was displayed as the performer slowly rotated and stretched the fabric in different ways.

    “I imagine it was a representation of multiculturalism,” junior Alex Ramos said.

    For the main performance of Corona’s exhibit, the primary performer, clad in a wide array of fabrics and plastics, emerged from behind one of the walls at the back of the room and took stage in a front corner of the gallery. Then, circling the area, the performer posed the exhibit’s central message to the audience, repeatedly asking the audience: “Are you an alien? Or are you a human? What makes you an alien, and what makes you a human in the United States?” The audience remained in a captivated silence for the duration of the performance.

    “It’s putting into movement, and color, the issues of being another, and living in the United States, and how you react to that feeling,” said Assistant Professor of Spanish Martin Ponti.

    The message of the performance connected with several of the attendees.

    “The definition of an alien in this exhibit encompassed so many more people than I thought it would,” senior Rachel Treglia, who found the performance particularly striking, said. She also noted the design of the exhibit as it related to the performance, saying, “The color is really focused on the costumes of the performers, so they stand out, and they don’t move much, but when they do, even the small movements feel big.”

    Corona specializes in art that utilizes color to express messages with greater meanings. The performance continued for an hour as the exhibition was opened up to all the patrons.

    While the performance was, as Ramos described it, “straightforward,” it spoke volumes.

    “I still think it’s great that the message is being put out there, and I feel that this performance really did a job of hammering it in to the people who came out to see it,” Ramos said.

  • Hoesy Corona to exhibit and perform at Washington College Kohl Gallery

    Hoesy Corona to exhibit and perform at Washington College Kohl Gallery

    Washington College Kohl Gallery

    Hoesy Corona: Alie[N]ation
    Tuesday, March 5 at 6PM
    Kohl Gallery is pleased to present a performance by artist Hoesy Corona on Tuesday, March 5.

    Alie[N]ation is a multimedia performance and installation that considers hyperbolized alien tropes, xenophobic language, and the archetype of the scapegoat in contemporary discourse. The work is informed by this leading research question: who is deemed an alien and who is seen as fully human in the United States?

  • Hoesy Corona named Tulsa Artist Fellow 2019!

    Hoesy Corona named Tulsa Artist Fellow 2019!

    Blouinartinfo

    The length of the award is unique among global arts fellowship and residency offerings. The substantial duration and resources intentionally addresses the most pressing challenges in artistic communities today, which include financial stability, durational housing, functional workspace, and platforms for presentation.

    The 2019 Tulsa Artist Fellows include Sarah Ahmad (Multidisciplinary); Rachel Allen (Fiction Writer); Julie Alpert (Installation and Drawing); Atomic Culture (Multidisciplinary); M. Molly Backes (Young Adult Novelist); Steven Bellin-Oka (Poet); Liz Blood (Writer and Editor); Ahimsa Timoteo Bodhran (Multimedia); Sarah Burney (Writer and Curator); Hoesy Corona (Multidisciplinary); Dan Farnum (Photography); Edgar Fabian Frias (Multidisciplinary); Sophie Goldstein (Graphic Novelist); Juliana Goodman (Young Adult Fiction Writer); Joy Harjo (Poet and Musician); Jessica Harvey (Multidisciplinary); Karl Jones (Writer, Editor, Performer, and Visual Artist); Kalup Linzy (Video and Visual Artist); Larry Blackhorse Lowe (Screenwriting and Filmmaker); Naima Lowe (Videographer and Photographer); Katie Moulton (Essayist); Molly Murphy Adams (Fiber Artist); Christa Romanosky (Fiction Writer); Olivia Stephens (Graphic Novelist); Candace G. Wiley (Poet); and Richard Zimmerman (Sculpturist and Installation).

  • Hoesy Corona (Labbodies) featured in Vulture magazine!!!

    Hoesy Corona (Labbodies) featured in Vulture magazine!!!

    Vulture

    “John Waters made me realize that it’s possible to make a body of work that is simultaneously liberating and uncomfortable to look at,” says Ada Pinkston, who co-founded Labbodies with fellow artist Hoesy Corona back in 2014. A performance and curatorial project focused around championing women and queer artists of color in museums, galleries, and public spaces, their activities include hosting an annual performance review, which brings together local and visiting artists for a weekend where you’re just as likely to attend a séance as participate in a punk-rock dance party. Labbodies, which had its humble beginnings at the infamous live-work loft, the Copycat Building, embraces a DIY ethos that is pervasive across Baltimore’s creative landscape, channeling Waters’s “fuck permission” mentality. Pinkston loves running into Waters at events and bars in Baltimore. “It’s fun to party with a legend in such a relaxed way,” she says, “to be able to talk to him, to get a head nod, which I read as, ‘It’s good to see that the next generation is fucking shit up!’”

  • Hoesy Corona featured in WAMU public radio American University DC

    Hoesy Corona featured in WAMU public radio American University DC

    WAMU.ORG

    Oriental rugs and handmade “scapegoat” figurines. Fortune cookies in a marble fountain. Images of young undocumented immigrants and black-and-white family photographs from the early 20th century.

    These are just some of the cultural stereotypes, styles and artistic traditions that clash and converse in “A (Good) American,” a new art exhibit at the Brewmaster’s Castle in Dupont Circle that opens Friday.
    ...
    In the dining room (above), Mexican artist Hoesy Corona set the table with embroidered placemats that read “I Am Not Your Scapegoat” and placed more than a hundred handmade scapegoat figurines around the room. Some sit side-by-side on the mantle with a Heurich vase that depicts three slaves holding up a bowl.

  • Hoesy Corona mentioned in Washington Post for SuperFine Art Fair DC

    Hoesy Corona mentioned in Washington Post for SuperFine Art Fair DC

    |https://www.washingtonpost.com/goingoutguide/museums/after-miami-and-new-york-this-high-end-art-fair-is-coming-to-union-market-to-change-how-dc-views-buying-art/2018/10/24/1b308084-d2ed-11e8-8c22-fa2ef74bd6d6_story.html?utm_term=.baf6729f3e07|Washington Post"

    Superfine will also showcase performance art, following the model of (e)merge, a locally organized art fair that ran from 2011 to 2014 at Southwest’s Capitol Skyline Hotel. Saturday’s “Unsettled” program will spotlight local artists Hoesy Corona, Rex Delafkaran, Maps Glover, Kunj and Tsedaye Makonnen.

    November 3rd, 2018 3-7PM

  • Hoesy Corona mentioned in The Fairfax County Times

    Hoesy Corona mentioned in The Fairfax County Times

    FairFax Times

    Reason #1: Performance Art.

    Not only will New York's “Sylva Dean and Me” woo you into Halloween art bliss on opening night [Oct. 31] alongside ethereal harp music by Erin Baker, but we've got a full program of performance art planned throughout the fair. A major highlight is “Unsettled,” a four hour showcase curated by Victoria Reis of DC's Transformer. DC emerging artists including Hoesy Corona, Rex Delafkaran, Maps Glover, Kunj, and Tsedaye Makonnen will present their ground-breaking performances on Saturday, Nov. 3 from 3-7pm.

  • Hoesy Corona featured on ABC 7 NEWS DC

    Hoesy Corona featured on ABC 7 NEWS DC
  • Hoesy Corona to perform at SuperFine Art Fair DC 11/03/18

    Hoesy Corona to perform at SuperFine Art Fair DC 11/03/18

    Transformer is pleased to present UNSETTLED – a performance art series curated by Victoria Reis, Founder and Director of Transformer, for the Superfine! Art Fair.

    UNSETTLED features performances by a select group of leading DC based emerging artists – Hoesy Corona, Rex Delafkaran, Maps Glover, Kunj, and Tsedaye Makonnen – each of whom are pushing performance art forward with their innovative, interdisciplinary work.

    Previously presented in Miami and New York, with upcoming manifestations in Los Angeles, Superfine! Art Fair – created in 2015 by James Miille, an artist, and Alex Mitow, an arts entrepreneur – makes its DC premiere October 31 to November 4, 2018 at Union Market’s Dock 5 event space, featuring 300 visual artists from DC and beyond who will present new contemporary artwork throughout 70 curated booths. Superfine! also features emerging collector events, tours, film screenings and panels. https://superfine.world/

    UNSETTLED artists Hoesy Corona, Rex Delafkaran, Maps Glover, Kunj, and Tsedaye Makonnen will
    each present approximately 40 minute long ‘roaming ‘performances, consecutively, between 3-7pm on Saturday,
    November 3 throughout the Superfine! Dock 5 space. Some performances may overlap.

  • Hoesy Corona featured in Howard County Times | Baltimore Sun

    Hoesy Corona featured in Howard County Times | Baltimore Sun

    Howard County Times

    Sitting in the studio space on the fifth floor in the Two Merriweather office building in Columbia, Hoesy Corona is in awe.

    “It’s huge,” he said, of the open space. “I’m getting glimpses of what I want my future studio to look like.”

    For two months, the multidisciplinary artist has, along with two other artists, been able to use the studio space as his own thanks to the inaugural Merriweather District Artist-in-Residence program in Downtown Columbia.

    Three artists – Sophia Brous, Eric Dyer and Corona – were selected from over 70 applications from across the United States and Europe to participate in the new program, which was created and funded by The Howard Hughes Corp. in collaboration with the Howard County Arts Council.

    “We went into this not really sure how much interest we would be able to create,” said Michele Whelley, MD AIR program manager. “The selection was very difficult. When we selected Hoesy, Eric and Sophia, we thought we had an amazing mix of mediums, experience and talent.”

    All three artists are multimedia. Dyer, of Baltimore, works with images from a zoetrope, a 19th –century animation toy, and digital video cameras. Brous is a performance-maker, musician and artistic director is based in New York and Australia.

    Each artist was provided studio space from June through July as well as an apartment and a stipend. Open houses were held to allow the public to see the artists at work and on July 25, a formal party was held featuring a discussion about art to bring the program’s first year to a close.

    “Artists-in-residence programs are really valuable for the artists and the hosting sites,” said Coleen West, executive directory of Howard County Arts Council. “It introduces new art forms into the community while artists get to be with other artists and learn from each other.”

    Corona was attracted to the program because it was new and in Columbia. Raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he moved to Baltimore 13 years ago to attend the Maryland Institute College of Art.

    “Even though I was just in Baltimore, I felt it was important to be here and get the feel of the community,” Corona said. “Doing this for two months, the first few weeks you’re setting up. Then, you realize when you are in the community when the local coffee shop knows your name.”

    Dyer, a professor at University of Maryland Baltimore County, was able to focus on his art with no worries, he said.

    “It’s rare to have the time, space, and funding to focus on a project - the residency provided all this. My work involves so much experimentation before real breakthroughs can happen,” Dyer wrote in an email. –“I deeply value how the funding and space enabled me to take big steps towards both the kinetic portraits and materialization of digital animation projects I’d formerly only been dreaming about.”

    The freedom the program offered “was appreciated,” Cornoa said.

    “They were open-ended on what the artist would be able to work on,” Corona said. “For a first year program, I think it was pretty amazing.”

    All three artists were invited, but not required, to submit works for inclusion in the second annual Opus festival to be held in October.

    Featuring music, large-scale art installations and technology, last year’s Opus festival, also hosted by the Howard Houghes Corp., attracted almost 16,000 people to the Merriweather District.

    “Howard Hughes has been really generous,” West said. “They are at the forefront of what corporations can do with their willingness to support artists.”

    While there were some ups an down, the program was an overall success, Whelley said.

    “There were a lot of lessons learned,” Whelley said. “We were so happy to get this program off the ground in a very short time.”

    Ideas are already being discussed for next year, from increasing the number of artists to lengthening the allotted time, West said.

    “It was a really great experience,” West said. “We hope to expand it and continue it next year.”

  • Hoesy Corona featured in The Asbury Park Sun

    Hoesy Corona featured in The Asbury Park Sun

    Asbury Park Sun

    ...
    And then on Aug 23, Mexican born and Baltimore based Hoesy Corona presents Climate Immigrants, a performance piece that incorporates a series of colorful art ponchos to reflect on the impending plight of climate-immigrants worldwide.

    Turning The Tide is a collaboration with Monmouth Arts. The series continues 7:30 pm Thursdays through Aug 23 on the Second Avenue Beach. For more information, click here.

  • Hoesy Corona on the influence of Social Media by Baltimore Magazine

    Hoesy Corona on the influence of Social Media by Baltimore Magazine

    Baltimore Magazine


    For local visual artist Hoesy Corona, he believes that social media is a game changer for the art world. By opening up the possibilities that were once limited to reach potential audiences, it’s helped him to establish his brand on his own terms.

    “I tend to use it as a professional extension of my studio practice—a virtual marketing assistant of sorts,” he says. “I can give both insight into my studio process, as well as keep my audience informed about my goings-on.”
    .....
    Corona shares a similar philosophy about the influence of social media and believes that it will only continue to help open the doors for artists and patrons alike.

    “Just a handful of years ago, artists were limited by the ways in which they could reach potential audiences and had to rely on discriminating middlepersons to sell their goods or gain access to show their work,” he explains. “Social media gives artists plenty of exposure without the help of predatory arts professionals which allows smaller independent artist run spaces to carve a niche for themselves and build a wider audience.”

  • Hoesy Corona included in Red Bull's Amaphiko Festival in Baltimore!

    Hoesy Corona included in Red Bull's Amaphiko Festival in Baltimore!

    RedBull Amaphiko

    THE MEDICINE SHOW

    WITH BE FREE FRIDAYS

    A night of social innovation storytelling featuring local artists and storytellers sharing the stories of Baltimore’s most inspiring social entrepreneurs through one-of-a-kind performances

    HOSTED BY
    LOVE THE POET

    MUSIC BY
    DJ HARVEY DENT

    +STORYTELLERS+
    NIA JUNE
    KONDWANI FIDEL
    DAVID FAKUNLE
    JOY POSTELL
    AMY REID
    EZE JACKSON
    HOESY CORONA
    SIR ALEX R


    +SOCIAL INNOVATORS+
    BRITTANY YOUNG
    B360

    WALKER MARSH
    THA FLOWER FACTORY

    AVA PIPITONE
    HOST HOME

    NICHOLAS MITCHEL
    NOISY TENANTS


    MICHAEL BATTLE
    THE RICH PROGRAM

    LILIANE MAKOLE
    MERA KITCHEN

    KYLE POMPEY
    PERSPECTIVE BALTIMORE

    VALERIA FUENTES
    ROOTS & RAICES

    ARENA PLAYERS | 801 MCCULOH

  • Hoesy Corona upcoming performance at Siren Arts featured in Tri City News , Asbury Park NJ,

    Hoesy Corona upcoming performance at Siren Arts featured in Tri City News , Asbury Park NJ,

    Hoesy Corona Tri City Press Siren Arts Asbury Park NJ 2018

  • Hoesy Corona awarded a summer residency at Siren Arts in Asbury Park, NJ Summer 2018

    Hoesy Corona awarded a summer residency at Siren Arts in Asbury Park, NJ Summer 2018

    TURNING THE TIDE
    July 12 – August 23, 2018
    2nd Annual ‘Siren Arts’ Summer Residency
    & Exhibition Program for Emerging Visual Artists
    Performance Art Events every Thursday evening at Sunset on
    the 2nd Avenue Beach, Asbury Park, NJ

    All Audiences Welcome; Presented Free of Charge

    Turning the Tide marks the 2nd year of Siren Arts, an innovative summer residency & exhibition program based in Asbury Park, NJ to support emerging visual artists throughout the northeast corridor of Washington, DC to NYC. Created by Victoria Reis, Executive & Artistic Director of Transformer – a 16 year old non-profit visual arts organization based in Washington, DC – Siren Arts is an expansion of Transformer’s mission to connect and promote emerging visual artists, build audiences for their work, and advance them in their artistic careers.

    Taking a different theme and format each year, Siren Arts 2nd year, Turning the Tide, is a social practice oriented residency program that will consist of a series of consecutive micro-residencies for seven emerging visual artists and artist collectives, resulting in Thursday evening sunset performance art events on Asbury Park’s 2nd Avenue beach July 12 – August 23, 2018. Informed and inspired by the work of the Plastic Pollution Coalition and their Asbury Park area partner Clean Water Action, each performance art event will focus on themes of ocean conservation. Highlighting a diverse range of artists based within the northeast corridor of DC to NYC, Turning the Tide will provide urban-based
    artists an opportunity to get out of their respective cities, enjoy creative time at the beach, and advance work they are currently pursing. Transformer’s goal with Turning the Tide is to empower the participating artists and engage audiences in positive action around ocean conservation through contemporary art.

    All events will take place at sunset, beginning at approximately 7:30/7:45, on the 2nd Avenue Beach in Asbury Park, NJ.

    Performances will last approximately 30-60 minutes and are open to all audiences free of charge.

    In the event of rain, performances will take place in the lobby of The Asbury Hotel at 8pm. Turning the Tide is being presented in collaboration with Monmouth Arts, who are providing community outreach, promotional support, as well as locally based artist participation. Turning the Tide is generously supported by The Andy Warhol Foundation, The National Endowment for the Arts’ Creativity Connects program, and by The Asbury Hotel, Siren Arts exclusive Hotel Sponsor. Special
    thanks to the City of Asbury Park for its support of Turning the Tide.
    PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE

    Thursday, July 12 - Rex Delafkaran
    Thursday, July 19 - Stephanie Mercedes
    Thursday, July 26 - Flatchestedmama Trefsger
    Thursday, August 2 - Naoko Wowsugi
    Thursday, August 9 - Tamar Ettun & The Moving Company
    Thursday, August 16 - Ed Woodham / The Keepers
    Thursday, August 23 - Hoesy Corona

    PERFORMANCE | THURSDAY, AUGUST 23
    Hoesy Corona, Climate-Immigrants
    Climate-Immigrants is a performance and series of colorful art ponchos that
    consider the impending plight of climate-immigrants worldwide. The clear
    raincoats feature vinyl cutouts depicting silhouettes of traveling immigrants
    against colorful floral backgrounds. These two-sided artworks are ephemera
    from “Alien Nation”, 2017, a temporary large-scale site specific performance
    at The Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden that considered
    similar themes.

    Hoesy Corona (b.1986. Mexico) lives and works in Baltimore, MD. He is a
    multidisciplinary artist who has shown compelling works and inventive sculptures
    fitted to the human body extensively at various institutional, private, public
    and underground venues including among others: The Hirshhorn Museum and
    Sculpture Garden; The Baltimore Museum of Art; The Walters Art Museum;
    The Peale Museum; Transformer DC; Decker Gallery; Delicious Spectacle; The
    Brooklyn International Performance Art Festival; VisArts; The Creative Alliance; and the Transmodern Festival.

    In addition to maintaining a prolific studio practice Corona is the founding co-director of Labbodies, an arts organization that creates opportunities for new media and performance artists to exhibit their work. Recent honors include a Halcyon Arts Lab Fellowship 2017-2018 in Washington, DC; an Andy Warhol Foundation Grit Fund Grant administered by The Contemporary in Visual Arts 2017; a Robert W. Deutsch Foundation’s Ruby’s Project Grants in Visual Art 2016-17; and a Light City public art commission in 2017

  • Hoesy Corona named inaugural Merriweather District Artist in Residence 2018

    Hoesy Corona named inaugural Merriweather District Artist in Residence 2018

    www.hocoarts.org/inaugural-md-air-artis… Howard County Arts Council|

    Program Includes Studio Space in Merriweather District

    June 21, 2018

    COLUMBIA, MD – The Howard Hughes Corporation®, in collaboration with the Howard County Arts Council, has announced the selection of artists to participate in the inaugural Merriweather District Artist-in-Residence (MD AIR) program in Downtown Columbia, MD.

    The artists in residence include Hoesy Corona and Eric Dyer of the Baltimore/Washington area, and Sophia Brous, an international artist working in New York and Melbourne, Australia. All three are multi-media, cross-disciplinary artists and will each receive a stipend of $10,000 and the use of studio space in the Merriweather District to spend up to two months, from June 11-August 31, creating work in a medium of their choosing.

    Brous is a performance-maker, musician and artistic director. Collaborating with artists, companies, festivals and concert houses internationally, she creates commissioned performance works. She is an Artistic Associate at the Arts Centre Melbourne, where she founded Supersense, a contemporary arts festival exploring ecstatic performance. During the Merriweather District residency she plans to devise a range of site-specific works with collaborators. Visit http://sophiabrous.com/about/.

    Corona’s project work encompasses installation, performance, sculpture, painting and public art. He is noted for his project “Alien Nation,” which was performed at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Gallery last summer. A graduate of The Maryland Institute of Art, Corona has been featured in dozens of exhibitions across the country and has extensive residency experience, including participation in the Latino Artist Residency Program in Pittsburgh. Corona is an advocate on behalf of the LGBTQ+ community. Visit http://hoesycorona.com/home.html.

    Dyer is an experimental animation and film artist who is known for his re-imagining of the zoetrope, a 19th century animation toy, with digital video cameras. During his residency in the Merriweather District, Dyer, who attended high school in Howard County, will create interactive animated artworks that explore the conflict between the usefulness of digital devices and the human need for physical, real-world experiences. Visit http://ericdyer.com/.

    Created and funded by The Howard Hughes Corporation, the MD AIR program attracted 73 applications from around the globe. The awardees were selected by a panel including artist William Cochran; Ken Farmer, curator of a New York City-based art production and design company Wild Dogs International; Howard County Arts Council Executive Director Coleen West; and Vanessa Rodriguez, Director of Marketing for The Howard Hughes Corporation.

    Studio space will be provided in Two Merriweather office building in Downtown Columbia’s Merriweather District. Residential accommodations will be provided within walking distance at The Metropolitan Downtown Columbia apartments.

    MD AIR 2018 is the first in what will be an annual program presented by The Howard Hughes Corporation to provide an opportunity for artists to spend time in the midst of Columbia’s evolving urban center. During the course of the residency, The Howard Hughes Corporation will host open studio events to showcase the work in progress and give members of the public access to the visiting artists. Works by MD AIR artists will be considered for inclusion in the second annual OPUS festival, scheduled for October 2018. Created and hosted by The Howard Hughes Corporation, the 2017 inaugural OPUS festival brought together a bold mix of art, music and technology for which Farmer was commissioned to curate an immersive, multi-sensory experience.


  • Hoesy Corona included in By The People at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building

    Hoesy Corona included in By The People at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building

    When: Saturday, June 23, 2018, 8 – 11:55 PM
    Categories: After Five, Celebrations, Performances, Workshops
    Sponsor: Special Smithsonian Event
    Venue: Arts and Industries Building
    Event Location: Arts and Industries Building
    Cost: Free

    Details:
    Join us at sunset (8:37 p.m.) in the Arts and Industries Building as Eaton Wellness presents the “Light of Summer Ceremony and Celebration” with energy clearing and guided meditation to set our intentions for the season then a release of intentions, wishes, dreams, and prayers into the heightened energy of these first summer nights with movement and music.

    Festivities include special performances by Konshens the MC, Hoesy Corona, Estefaní Mercedes, Antonius Bui, and Eaton Wellness.

  • Hoesy Corona Interviewed by OtherPeoplesPixels

    Hoesy Corona Interviewed by OtherPeoplesPixels

    OTHERPEOPLESPIXELS BLOG

    HOESY CORONA takes a multimedia approach to art-making. His complex performance works, which involve movement, costume, light and sound, balance alienation with celebration. His sculptural works explore the role of scapegoating in maintaining cultural dominance. Concerned with a queerness, immigration and climate change, he explores the many forms of marginalization in North American society. Hoesy earned his BFA at The Maryland Institute College of Art in 2009 and is currently a MAT candiate. He has exhibited at The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, The Baltimore Museum of Art, The Walters Art Museum and The Peale Museum, among numerous others. In 2017, he received an Andy Warhol Foundation Grit Fund Grant and, in 2016, a Ruby’s Project Grant in Visual Arts. He is a 2017-2018 Halcyon Arts Lab Fellow, as well as an Artist-in Residence at the Fillmore School Studio in Washington, D.C. Hoesy lives and works in Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland.

    OtherPeoplesPixels: Costumes that obscure the identity of the wearer feature prominently in your performance work, especially The Nobodies (2009-present). Who are The Nobodies?

    Hoesy Corona: The Nobodies are no one and everyone at once. In this series I consider what it means to be a disenfranchised member of society in North America by embodying the abstract concept of nobody, nothing all of a sudden becomes individualized, becomes body and eyes, becomes no one. I started this series after reading The Labyrinth of Solitude by Octavio Paz in which he describes the fraught psyches in the relationship between Mexico and The United States in detail. As a Mexican immigrant artist living in the U.S. for most of my life, I consider the paradox of the simultaneous visibility and invisibility of the immigrant in the U.S. In this series I invite audience members to participate in the act of nobodying, an operation that consists of making somebody into nobody.

    Nobodies Gala, 2016.
    OPP: Can you talk about the materials you use to construct the wearable sculptures?

    HC: I use a variety of familiar everyday materials to construct these wearable sculptures. When I started the series in 2009, I was working as a florist and was drawn to discarded floral packaging materials—cellophane, ribbons, mylar, silk florals, and mesh nettings—and collected them obsessively. Once I had amassed a substantial amount of stuff, I then transformed the materials into other-worldly colorful wearable sculptures that accompanied a live performance. I no longer work as a florist, but I am still interested in using different types of plastics as well as wigs, silk flowers, lights, clear film, and adhesive vinyls to construct new Nobodies.

    OPP: What kinds of movements do the Nobodies perform in public spaces?

    HC: The movements in the Nobodies are very subtle and sculptural. Oftentimes, viewers don’t realize that the sculptures are being animated by real people. The slow movements invite the audience members to pause as they consider the situation before them. In public spaces these performances are particularly poignant as the unsuspecting viewers encounter the Nobodies in their natural setting.

    Scapegoat Monument, 2014.
    OPP: The Scapegoats show up both as static sculptures—some life sized and some tiny—and performance characters. Do you see one iteration as more successful than the other? How do they work differently on the audience?

    HC: I often intertwine the archetype of the scapegoat as a way to have us visualize the strategic selection of somebody, made into nobody, for the supposed wellbeing of the group. The sculptural forms don’t always involve a live performance, but are still performative in their context. In Scapegoat Thrones, for instance, I use found chair structures as the base of each sculpture and ask audience members to consider the cost of the comfort that is afforded to them in the world. So while there is no live performance involved, the audience can still imagine themselves in relation to the chair forms. Most recently during a residency at Ox-Bow School of Art, I worked in the ceramic studio to construct miniature Scapegoat Idols that can be handled by audience members. My hope is that one day each person in the US will have their own Scapegoat Idol that they can use to liberate themselves from negative feelings of blame and shame.


    Scapegoat Idol, 2016
    OPP: Tell us about Alien Nation (2017) at the Hirschhorn Museum in Washington D.C.

    HC: Alien Nation, curated by Victoria Reis at The Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, was my most ambitious site specific performance to date. It included with 24 performers and two musicians. This mysterious and surprising shadow casting performance originated in response to the unique circular architecture of the museum. I knew I wanted to do something of a global scale that implicated a broad audience and included as many people as possible, so I conceived the idea of climate induced migration as a very real issue of our time that needs to be voiced.

    OPP: The piece was viewable from the inside and from the outside. . . how were the viewing experiences different?

    HC: Although the museum was open late and visitors had the opportunity to sneak a peek of the performers on the second floor rotunda, most of the 1,200 audience members were patiently waiting outside around the fountain for the performance to begin as intended. Once outside, audience members saw 24 climate-immigrants backlit with purple light creating mysterious and surprising shadows in each of the 24 windows on the second floor rotunda. The 24 performers wore what I call “climate ponchos,” which included head gear that obscured the performers faces, an approach I chose because of the mystery and anonymity it afforded. Always silent these figures created subtle, sculptural movements in various locations that were complemented by live drumming juxtaposed with natural foley sounds that included ice-cracking, loons, and running water. Slowly over the course of the performance the Climate-Immigrants started to descend downstairs and continued on their journey through the sea of bodies.

    The clear wearable climate ponchos were adorned with images that depicted the archetype of the Traveler, with the people depicted wearing backpacks, carrying suitcases, wearing hats and some holding children. They were all on their way somewhere, in one direction a lot of the times. This simple showing of people in movement, in transition, resonates with a world-wide issue and echoed the reality of the viewers as they themselves traversed space to witness the performance.

    OPP: In the Fall of 2017, you began a Fellowship at the Halcyon Arts Lab. Tell us bit about the program and your experience. How did it change your work?

    HC: Halcyon Arts Lab is a fully funded, nine-month, international incubator that nurtures socially engaged artists in Washington D.C. I was lucky enough to be selected as one of 8 fellows for the inaugural cohort 2017-2018 to continue my work on Alien Nation. The program includes a range of professional development opportunities as well as tons of studio visits from renowned arts professionals. In addition, I am being mentored by Alberto Fierro Garza, Director of The Mexican Cultural Institute of Washington D.C. and mentoring a young artist myself. In the short seven months that I’ve been here, my practice has strengthen by leaps and bounds, I suspect this has everything to do with the nurturing environment the fellowship provides. I encourage all socially engaged artists to keep an eye on this fellowship and consider applying in the years to come!

  • Hoesy Corona to exhibit in Athens, Greece with Transformer DC at Platforms Projects Independent Art Fair

    Hoesy Corona to exhibit in Athens, Greece with Transformer DC at Platforms Projects Independent Art Fair

    Country: USA

    Participants Artists: Hoesy Corona, Rex Delafkaran, Kunj Patel plus additional works from DC artists in their evolving FlatFile collection



    Email: info@transformerdc.org

    https://platformsproject.com/platforms/transformer/

  • Hoesy Corona artist profile in The Washington Blade

    Hoesy Corona artist profile in The Washington Blade

    LINK: www.washingtonblade.com/2018/04/04/loca… Washington Blade|

    One of the artists on display is Hoesy Corona, whom art aficionados around D.C. and Baltimore may not immediately connect with his more familiar alter ego — Dr. H. Corona.

    “I think of myself as an artist of change. My performative alter egos are part of my larger inquiry into who we are and how we construct ourselves and our identities,” Corona says. “And how so often those who exist on the margins of society have to change who they are simply to survive.”

    He describes his project-based work as “predicated on a multimedia approach that encompasses installation, performance, sculpture, painting and public art,” exploring what it means to be a queer Latino person in a place where there are few. In his work, Corona considers the psychological and physical ramifications of never seeing oneself reflected anywhere.

    “My work is content driven but aesthetically motivated,” he says. “As such, I’ve developed a personal creative vocabulary that I implement in the studio when constructing a new piece. Recurring themes of queerness, immigration, climate change, alienation and celebration are all present throughout my work. I create otherworldly colorful manifestations that seduce and draw in the audience closer to the work while challenging their preconceived notions.”

    The 30-year-old, Mexican-American multidiscipline artist is originally from Baltimore, but now lives in Washington, working full-time as an artist and fulfilling a fellowship at Halcyon Arts Lab, an organization that nurtures the development of socially engaged artists.

    He’s been creative for as long as he can remember, with his earliest memories being of holding pencils or playing with non-hardening clay. Corona attended the Maryland Institute College of Art and studied painting and independent curatorial studies.

    “I was trained as a painter so some early influences include Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, David Hockney and Paula Rego,” he says. “As I developed my practice, I started to embrace the notion of being an uncategorized artist — as such I’ve been influenced by national artists Teresita Fernandez, Coco Fusco, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Guillermo Gomez Peńa, Nick Cave and Kalup Linzy; and local artists Valeska Populoh, Joyce J. Scott, Melissa Webb, Paul Rucker, Ada Pinkston and Laure Drogoul.”

    His work has appeared at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Walters Art Museum, Current Space, Delicious Spectacle and Panoply Performance Laboratory.

    “I am also an arts organizer as the founding co-director of Labbodies, a nomadic arts organization that creates opportunities for new media and performance artists to exhibit their work,” Corona says. “With Labbodies, we have a strong focus of working with artists of color, queer artists and non-conforming artists.”

    For Light City Baltimore, Corona’s project is entitled “Alien Nation 2,” and he focuses on bringing to life a small excerpt from a larger project that took place last summer at the Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

    “For that project, I wanted to do something of a global scale that implicated a broad audience and included as many people as possible,” he says. “So, I conceived of the idea of climate-induced migration as a very real issue of our time that needs to be voiced.”

    In Alien Nation, he considers the impending plight of climate immigrants worldwide. The performers will wear what he calls “climate ponchos,” which include head gear that obscures their faces, an approach he chose because of the mystery and anonymity it affords and because of its ability to absorb laser and light effects. Always silent, these figures will roam about the festival’s two-mile space at the Inner Harbor and in various locations create repetitive sculptural forms and movements for attendees.

    The clear wearable climate ponchos are adorned with images that depict the archetype of the “traveler,” with the people depicted wearing backpacks, carrying suitcases, wearing hats and some holding children.

    “They are all on their way somewhere, in one direction a lot of the times,” he says. “This simple showing of people in movement, in transition, resonates with a world-wide issue and echoes the reality of the festival goers as they themselves traverse the festival footprint to see light installations.”

    In his ongoing series, the Nobodies (2009-present), Corona utilizes colorful sculptural garments fitted to the human body to create other worldly experiences for the viewer.

    “I revel in the simultaneous visibility and invisibility that the garments bring to the wearer. In these public performances, I invite audience members to play a part in the act of nobodying, an operation that consists of making somebody, nobody,” he says. “Nothing all of a sudden becomes individualized, becomes body and eyes becomes no one.”

    Corona’s roving performance at Light City will take place on April 14-15 from 8-11 p.m. His work can also be seen in the “Queer(ed) Performativity” group show at D.C. Arts Center curated by Andy Johnson, April 13-May 20; and in May, he will be traveling to Athens, Greece with Transformer D.C. as part of a Sister Cities grant. In September, he will be part of a group show at the Strathmore curated by Laura Irene.

    And who is Corona aside from his artwork?

    “I love my friends and family, I love drag queens and I know I’m procrastinating when I start a new series on Netflix,” the Scorpio, who’s single, says. “I love fresh empanadas and my go-to morning drink is fresh cold brew with coconut milk.”

    He devours podcasts like “Latinos Who Lunch” and “Modern Art Notes” and is himself at work on a forthcoming Latino podcast with artist Mercedes Estefani called “Vale N. Tina Podcast,” dubbed in honor of Valentina from “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” which he says will focus on art, politics and Latino culture.

  • Hoesy Corona included in "Queer(ed) Performativity" at DC Arts Center curated by Andy Johnson

    Hoesy Corona included in "Queer(ed) Performativity" at DC Arts Center curated by Andy Johnson

    Queer(ed) Performativity.

    DC Arts Center
    2438 18th St NW, Washington, District of Columbia 20009

    April 13-May 20

    Curated by Andy Johnson
    Mentor Curators: Zoë Charlton, and Tim Doud

    Exhibiting artists: Eames Armstrong, Antonius Bui, Hoesy Corona, Alexandra “Rex” Delafkaran, Myles Loftin, Stephanie Mercedes, and David Vassalli.

    Queer(ed) Performativity points to a rise in the production, distribution, and consumption of queerness in both mainstream American culture and media. The performativity of queerness and the queer(ed) body has, within the past two decades, served as a note of comedic and anxious relief, a catch all for the uneasiness felt from the deconstruction of gender binaries and the shifting attitudes towards the fluidity of sexuality. The crux of Queer(ed) Performativity raises attention to the fact that the queer(ed) body is lauded, celebrated, and put on display when in the service of white heterosexual consumption. The exhibition underscores the incisive ways in which artists respond to, subvert, and refuse a politics of respectability and heteronormativity vis-a-vis both art objects and the body. Whether through the hyper-performance of queerness, the refusal to perform the role of the queer, or somewhere in between, the artists question the role of “queer” within late-capitalist neoliberal circles.

  • Hoesy Corona to perform at Light City 2018

    Hoesy Corona to perform at Light City 2018
  • FrameWork Panel #27: Challenging Colonialism in Contemporary Art at The Mexican Cultural Institute DC featuring Hoesy Corona

    FrameWork Panel #27: Challenging Colonialism in Contemporary Art at The Mexican Cultural Institute DC featuring Hoesy Corona

    Transformer DC presents: FRAMEWORK PANEL #27:
    CHALLENGING COLONIALISM IN CONTEMPORARY ART

    Wednesday, March 21, 2018
    6:30 – 8:00 pm

    The Mexican Cultural Institute
    2829 16th St NW
    Washington, DC 20009

    Attendance is FREE. -

    Featuring: Ash Arder; Dulcina Abreu; Adrienne Elise Tarver; Hoesy Corona -

    Moderator: Edgar Endress -
    -
    Transformer continues our ongoing FRAMEWORK Panel Series with FRAMEWORK Panel #27: Challenging Colonialism in Contemporary Art. This panel will highlight emerging artists challenging commonly held notions of how their identities have been defined through colonialism, history, and popular culture.
    This panel is presented in conjunction with Transformer’s spring exhibition, Queer Tropics, a group exhibition that considers the abstract idea of the tropics and how that vision has been variously created, reinforced, and confronted. Originally presented at Pelican Bomb Gallery X in New Orleans, November 2017, Queer Tropics features artworks that examine the visual and cultural systems through which one imagines the landscape of the tropics as a site of leisure, sensuality, and play.

  • Hoesy Corona included in "Hyphen-American" at George Washington University's Gallery 102

    Hoesy Corona included in "Hyphen-American" at George Washington University's Gallery 102

    Gallery 102 is proud to present Hyphen American, an exhibition that challenges and unsettles the liminal space of hybrid cultural identity within the American lexicon. Through painting, sculpture, video, photography, performance, and installation, the exhibition addresses the mythification of immigrants and first-generation Americans. The artists on view refuse, engage with, subvert, and satirize the exotification and fetishization that one often confronts when engaged with multiple cultural identities.

    The “othering” of immigrant communities is historically rooted in the cultural identity of America. Whiteness, as a synonym for the US, relies on the “other” to distinguish itself politically, socially, and economically. Our melting pot is merely a distraction to perpetuate erasure and cultural genocide; a mantra that willfully ignores the ramifications of American cultural essentialism. With the recent anniversary of Trump’s Muslim travel ban, and attention paid to alt-right, nationalist, white supremacist groups, it is imperative to resist the scapegoat tactics deployed by racist, sexist, xenophobic, and homophobic groups.

    Hyphen American, while admittedly incomprehensive in scope, is a humble and empowered attempt to create paths through barriers from the symbolic construction of hybridized languages derived from a mother tongue.

    Exhibiting artists: Ani Bradberry, Baseera Khan, Dominique Duroseau, Fabiola Yurcisin, Hector Canonge, Helina Metaferia, Hoesy Corona, Joseph Orzal, Kunj, Lloyd Foster, Marcelline, Mojdeh Rezaeipour, Nakeya Brown, Nana Ama Bentsi-Enchill, Nyugen Smith, Sheida Soleimani, Tariku Shiferaw, Tsige Tafesse, Zavé Martohardjono.

    Curated by: Tsedaye Makonnen & Rex Delafkaran

  • Labbodies in Baltimore Beat's top 10 2017 art shows!

    Labbodies in Baltimore Beat's top 10 2017 art shows!

    4. LabBodies’ “BBB Performance Art Review III: Freedom” at SpaceCamp: “Freedom” is an apt curatorial theme for a performance art showcase any time: Both freedom and performance art itself are ephemeral and, more often than not, they implicate the body. But for these artists—mostly women of color—the slipperiness of freedom nearly year into the Trump regime made for an especially potent point to pass through and break down. At performance art incubator LabBodies’ third annual “Borders, Boundaries, and Barricades (BBB)” exhibition (the first of which took place in 2015 in response to the uprising), we saw the effects and survival of oppression distilled into commanding images of endurance, repetition, and gesture. (Maura Callahan)

    Baltimore Beat

  • Labbodies in Bmore Art's Best Exhibitions of 2017!

    Labbodies in Bmore Art's Best Exhibitions of 2017!

    6. LabBodies’ Freedom Free-Done Performance Series at SpaceCamp
    The beauty of LabBodies Performance Art Review is that you never know what to expect until you are sharing observant, participatory space with the artists as they perform. Each action is a disruptive and engaging encounter that problematizes, critiques, and demands attention while the installation work enhances and expounds on the ideas performed.

    In the face of an overwhelming persistence of local, national, and international disparities, corruptions and assaults on basic civil liberties, it is telling and timely that Dr. H Corona and Dr. A. Pinkston chose freedom as an explorative prompt for participants in LabBodies‘ annual Performance Art Review at SpaceCamp, where a collection of immersive installations and live performances have transformed the gallery into a site for critical discourse on freedom. Freedom Free-Done offered reflective affirmations visualizing freedom’s potential, and how collective and individual imaginings about freedom can dismantle the decrepit and exclusive systems that threaten to destroy the world. – AC

    Bmore Art

  • Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston (Labbodies) speakers at this year's Common Field Convening in LA

    Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston (Labbodies) speakers at this year's Common Field Convening in LA

    Common Field

    Dr. A Pinkston and Dr. H. Corona: "How to cook an ehtnic meal in a white establishment Or Fake it Until you Make it. An entire Team of Two"

    There is a complex constellation that ties all artists and arts administrators together regianlly, nationally, and globally. What does it mean to be within the "in crowd" when you live on the margings of society? During their performative lecture, the doctors will discuss their findings about art institutions and organizations in the D.C. Maryland and Virginia region. In particular, they will discuss their experience as artist organzizers who run Labbodies Performance Art Lab in Baltimore. These questions and more will be addressed in a lecture performance by Dr. A. Pinkston and Dr. H. Corona.

  • Hoesy Corona will join the Queer Interiors Closing Panel at The Baltimore Museum of Art

    Hoesy Corona will join the Queer Interiors Closing Panel at The Baltimore Museum of Art

    Queer Interiors: Closing Celebration
    August 26 · 2:00pm –
    Free

    During the final month of Queer Interiors, join us in celebrating artists Jaimes Mayhew and Rahne Alexander and their year-long partnership with the BMA and The LGBT Health Resource Center at Chase Brexton. Performances and a panel discussion will highlight LGBTQI+ artists and their contributions to contemporary discourse.

    Enjoy performances by Rahne Alexander and Lurch and Holler (Liz Downing & Michael R. Willis), plus a panel discussion with Jaimes and Rahne, curator Steven Vider, filmmaker Emily Eaglin, and artist Hoesy Corona on LGBTQI+ artists and their contributions to contemporary discourse.

    Image: Jaimes Mayhew and Rahne Alexander (photography by Jill Fannon).

  • Hoesy Corona included in exhibition at NYU DC this Fall!

    Hoesy Corona included in exhibition at NYU DC this Fall!

    VISUAL ARTS - SEPTEMBER 15 - OCTOBER 14, 2017

    HOME + DISCORDANCE = US

    Curated by: Jackie Hoysted, Solas Nua
    Artists: Holly Bass, Larry Cook, Hoesy Corona, Heloisa Escudero, Erin Devine, John Brendan Guinan, Jackie Hoysted, Ann Lewis, Tsedaye Makonnen, Akemi Maegawa, Carolina Mayorga, Sheldon Scott, René Treviño, Anna Tsouhlarakis and Helen Zughaib
    Venue: NYU Washington DC, 1307 L St NW, Washington, DC 20005
    Opening Reception: Friday, September 15, 6-8 pm including live artist performances.

  • Hoesy Corona in Baltimore Magazine's Best of Baltimore 2017

    Hoesy Corona in Baltimore Magazine's Best of Baltimore 2017

    BALTIMORE MAGAZINE
    BEST OF BALTIMORE 2017

    THOUGHT-PROVOKING INSTALLATION
    LIGHT HAPPENINGS II AT LIGHT CITY
    We couldn't walk by this immersive Light City work without stopping. Labbodies, a performance art laboratory envisioned by Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston, stirringly examined devastating moments in U.S. history.

    Baltimore Magazine

  • Hoesy Corona coming up at Torpedo Factory Art Center

    Hoesy Corona coming up at Torpedo Factory Art Center

    The Late Shift: Boardwalk Nights
    August 18 @ 7:00 pm - August 19 @ 12:00 am
    The Late Shift: Boardwalk Nights is the last of three late-night festivals over the course of the 2017 summer season. Experience a late-night art happening along the riverfront and in the Torpedo Factory.

    Featured Artists

    – Superwaxx

    – Lindsay Hall

    – Anne Smith

    Including Artist Showcase curated by Quota (Dawne Langford):
    – Hoesy Corona
    – Rachel Schmidt
    – Rodrigo Carazas Portal

    Torpedo Factory

  • Labbodies Performance Art Review III: Freedom RFP now open!

    Labbodies Performance Art Review III: Freedom RFP now open!

    LABBODIES PERFORMANCE ART REVIEW 2017 | FREEDOM

    Request for Proposals Now Open!
    Deadline: September 1st 2017 (MIDNIGHT ET)

    APPLY HERE: APPLICATION

    free·dom
    ˈfrēdəm/
    noun: freedom
    the power or right to act, speak, or think as one wants without hindrance or restraint.
    “do we have freedom of choice?"

    absence of subjection to foreign domination or despotic government.
    "he was a champion of freedom"

    synonyms:
    independence, self-government, self-determination, self-rule, home rule, sovereignty, nonalignment, autonomy; democracy
    "revolution is the only path to freedom”
    the state of not being imprisoned or enslaved "the shark thrashed its way to freedom"

    Synonyms: liberty, liberation, release, deliverance, delivery, discharge; literary disenthrallment; Historical manumission -"a desperate bid for freedom"

    lib·er·a·tion
    libəˈrāSH(ə)n/
    noun: liberation; plural noun: liberations
    the act of setting someone free from imprisonment, slavery, or oppression; release.
    "the liberation of all political prisoners"

    freedom from limits on thought or behavior.
    "the struggle for women's liberation"

    LabBodies is currently accepting proposals for it’s third annual performance art review: FREEDOM, November 1 - 29, 2017, at SpaceCamp.

    For its third iteration of Boundaries, Borders and Barricades Performance Art Review, Labbodies invites proposals from artists from the DMV area for site-specific installations, live performances, video projections and new media work to address topics related to freedom.

    Project proposals should examine the concept of freedom in 21st century, searching for liberation or freedom in the face of extreme oppression. Artists are encouraged to examine moments in history where freedom is sparse and preserved for only a few citizens in the United States.

    Sexual freedom, physical freedom, psychological freedom, racial freedom, and economic freedom.

    How do the isms of our society interact with the state of being that is free? What does it reveal about our society? What comes with freedom? What does freedom look like in the context of the past, present and future? How do we obtain freedom? We seek proposals that examine any and all of these questions.

    Submissions must be submitted by September, 1 2017. Selections will be made by the Labbodies Team and notified no later than September 15th, 2017

    Selected artists will receive a $500 honorarium to produce new work. Proposals are welcome from visual and performance artists from DMV area. Strong consideration for artists of color, non-binary, LGBTQP who feel that they have been marginalized or disenfranchised from traditional presentations of art.

    HOW TO APPLY:
    -To submit please send the following application requirements: 500 word proposal, 200 word bio, budget here: Application Form

    -Additionally, please email 5 Image samples (photo and video), one image must be a sketch of proposed work to labbodiesgeneral@gmail.com with your name_freedom in the subject line.

    TIMELINE:
    Call for Artists - August 6th - September 1st 2017
    Application Deadline: September 1st, 2017 (MIDNIGHT ET)
    Artists Notified: September 15th, 2017
    Exhibition/Performance: Nov 1st-Nov 29th 2017

    Sponsored in part by an Andy Warhol Foundation Grit Fund Grant, administered by The Contemporary

  • Hoesy Corona selected for a Halcyon Arts Lab Fellowship!

    Hoesy Corona selected for a Halcyon Arts Lab Fellowship!

    http://halcyonhouse.org/hoesy-corona

    "
    Halcyon Arts Lab
    At the intersection of art and social impact, this nine-month fellowship supports emerging artists with bold ideas of how art and creativity can be forces for social change.

    Announcing the debut Halcyon Arts Lab Cohort
    We are thrilled to introduce the first official Arts Lab cohort to the Halcyon community. Coming this fall, meet the eight new fellows behind the creative art – from storytelling through the eyes of incarcerated youth, to performative sculptures investigating alien tropes and combating xenophobia.

    SPOTLIGHT:
    Hoesy Corona is a multi-disciplinary artist and arts organizer creating videos and soundscapes for his visual and performance project Alie[N]ation which investigates and dismantles alien tropes, xenophobic language and the archetype of the scapegoat. Participants wear colorful garments fitted to the human body, which create otherworldly experiences as the wearer is simultaneously visible and invisible – both stripping and enhancing identity and reality.

    Corona (b. Mexico 1986, based in the United States of America) is a multidisciplinary artist and the founding co-director of Labbodies, a nomadic arts laboratory that creates opportunities for new media and performance artists to exhibit their work. Throughout his short career, Corona has shown compelling works and inventive sculptures fitted to the human body extensively. He oftentimes presents works at a variety of institutional, private, public and underground venues such as the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Walters Art Museum; the Peale Museum; the Songs for Presidents Gallery; the Panoply Performance Laboratory; the Decker Gallery; the Brooklyn International Performance Art Festival; VisArts; Current Space; Creative Alliance; the Haggerty Museum and others. Corona’s recent honors include a Light City Public Art Commission in 2017; an Andy Warhol Foundation Grit Fund Grant in Visual Arts, administered by The Contemporary in 2017; and a Robert W. Deutsch Foundation Ruby's Project Grant in Visual Arts in 2016.

    To learn more about Hoesy Corona, visit hoesycorona.com and labbodies.com.

    Description of Artwork: "Alien Nation," 2017 by Hoesy Corona | Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Shadow/Casters curated by Victoria Reis | "Transformer" photo by Andy DelGiudice"

  • Hoesy Corona quoted in Bmore Art

    Hoesy Corona quoted in Bmore Art

    "The Artist-Run Art Fair is curated by Baltimore collective Open Space, and this year featured eleven galleries, including Clr’d Collective, Current Space, Fjord, Kahlon, Labbodies, Little Berlin, Little Foes-LFHQ, Make Studio, Open Space, Terrault, and Yeah Maybe.

    “Labors of love (especially those that are artist-led) are vital to the city yet end up being hard to upkeep,” says Dr. H. Corona, a participating artist who co-directs LabBodies. “It’s especially [difficult] with no sustainable local funding infrastructure in place to support small artist-centered arts organizations as they begin to grow, travel, take big creative leaps or just simply try to continue to exist.” ARAF provides a platform for emerging artists to take the lead, with plenty of space and free rein to challenge traditional presentations of art."

    Bmore Art

  • Hoesy Corona highlighted in Baltimore Magazine

    Hoesy Corona highlighted in Baltimore Magazine

    "I am one of the founders of the arts organization Labbodies and I am a part of the Artist-Run Art Fair. We’re typically known for doing large-scale performances and art works in unconventional spaces, so we took this opportunity to showcase documents of performances that have happened recently, instead of actual live performances. We have three local artists featured who are decontextualizing the black female body in contemporary times. I think the Artist-Run Art Fair is the best part of Artscape. It’s really focused on artist-run spaces, so there are a lot of artists who are blurring the line between producer and organizer. It has a different feel, and I like that authenticity about it."
    -Hoesy Corona

    Baltimore Magazine

  • Shout Out from Hirshhorn Museum!

    Shout Out from Hirshhorn Museum!

    www.instagram.com/hirshhorn/?hl=en Hirshhorn Instagram|

    SHADOW/CASTERS
    Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
    June 10th, 2017
    Washington, DC

    curated by Victoria Reis | Transformer DC

  • Hoesy Corona in Metro Weekly

    Hoesy Corona in Metro Weekly

    Metro Weekly

    "“The artists have each been really thoughtful in how they’re thinking about myths around the full moon and summer solstice,” says Reis, “and they’re each looking at them from their own personal, cultural identity.” Jason Barnes — aka Pussy Noir — will reflect on African-American rituals, Alexandra ‘Rex” Delafkaran on Persian traditions, and Kunj Patel on Indian festivals.

    The core of Shadow/Casters is a dramatic display of light and shadow by Hoesy Corona that will transform the museum’s inner-courtyard into a shadow theater. “Through light projections within the Hirshhorn, [24 assisting artists] will be casting shadows on the second floor of the museum that the audience will experience from the courtyard,” says Reis."

  • Hoesy Corona at The Hirshhorn Museum!

    Hoesy Corona at The Hirshhorn Museum!

    Hirshhorn Museum Press Release

    The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden will partner with local arts organization Transformer to present “Shadow/Casters,” an after-hours performance art event on the Hirshhorn’s outdoor plaza Saturday, June 10, 7:30–11 p.m. Guests will be invited to explore the museum during special extended hours, enjoy a cash bar and music on the plaza, and take in four site-specific performances that creatively explore abundance, transition and community through contemporary storytelling and ritual.

    Coinciding with Transformer’s 15th anniversary and the approaching summer solstice, “Shadow/Casters” features one-night-only performances by Washington-based artists Jason Barnes (Pussy Noir), Alexandra ‘Rex’ Delafkaran, Kunj and Hoesy Corona.

    “Shadow/Casters” will take audiences on a visual journey through culture, time, and space with a variety of immersive performance styles, including dance and drumming. The evening culminates as the moon emerges, with a three-story tall performance that transforms the Hirshhorn’s iconic round building into a physical shadow theater and creates a spectacular display of light and shadow, designed to be experienced by the crowds gathered below.

    Tickets are $18, and will be available online May 9. “Shadow/Casters” is presented in conjunction with D.C.’s annual Capital Pride festival, held June 8–11, and in partnership with Smithsonian GLOBE (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Employees).

    The evening is curated by Transformer’s Executive and Artistic Director Victoria Reis.

    “Shadow/Casters” joins the Hirshhorn’s 2017–18 schedule of diverse contemporary art that reflects global conversations that shape history, politics and culture, including work by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, German artist Markus Lüpertz, Swiss artist Nicolas Party, and American artists Yoko Ono, Theaster Gates and Mark Bradford.

  • Hoesy Corona will present a new performance at The Hirshhorn in June!

    Hoesy Corona will present a new performance at The Hirshhorn in June!

    Washington City Paper

    "All of the artists who will appear at the Hirshhorn After Hours event showed their work previously at Transformer in Defy/Define, a show from last fall. Jason Barnes (Pussy Noir), Alexandra “Rex” Delafkaran, and Kunj Patel will each perform works in the museum courtyard.

    Baltimore’s Hoesy Corona will man the shadow-casting performance from inside the Hirshhorn’s window-ringed donut with Labbodies, the performance collective he co-directs. Transformer is working with the Hirshhorn’s time-based media specialist, Drew Doucette, and the museum’s new curator of media and performance, Mark Beasley, to sort out the challenge of turning the Hirshhorn into a zoetrope. "

  • Hoesy and Labbodies in the Amtrak Newsletter

    Hoesy and Labbodies in the Amtrak Newsletter

    "SNAE has overseen large projects such as The Urban Playground Team which
    combined elements of functional architecture and design with performanceparkour,
    street dance, and street based arts and sporting disciplines to present
    Play the Plaza; Dark City in 2016, where The Dark Lab, curated by Ada
    Pinkston and Hoesy Corona, created a bilateral contemporary art exhibition
    that hosted Light Research Kiosk, a series of pop-up performances that collected
    responses to the question “What gives you Light?” which was then
    interpreted as Dark City, a temporary installation. "

    Amtrak Newsletter

  • Labbodies in The Baltimore Sun!

    Labbodies in The Baltimore Sun!

    Baltimore Sun

    "Light Happenings Part II by Labbodies houses performance artists examining some of the most devastating moments in history."

  • Labbodies in the Baltimore Business Journal!

    Labbodies in the Baltimore Business Journal!
  • Labbodies Makes top 13 Light City Installations in Fodors Travel!

    Labbodies Makes top 13 Light City Installations in Fodors Travel!

    Fodors Travel

    "LIGHT HAPPENINGS PART II
    Artist: Labbodies, 2017

    Materials: Glass and steel frames, LED lights, projectors, el wire

    Okay, this one’s a little more startling, and complicated, than most. Three glass-and-steel houses—one rectangular, two pyramidal—are framed with LED lights. And inside, real-life performance artists examine some of history’s most devastating moments, encouraging the viewer to engage in discussion. The backstory? The installation marks the site of the first Civil War’s first casualty, here in Baltimore, a war that stemmed from racial inequality. And, with the 9/11 Memorial located nearby as well, it reminds us of current examples of racial inequality and how this conversation must extend beyond Baltimore into the world."

  • Labbodies in The Baltimore Times!

    Labbodies in The Baltimore Times!

    Baltimore Times


    "LABBODIES will present Light Happenings II, a site-specific installation and performance program by lead artists Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston, who are also LABBODIES founding co-directors. The project examines devastating moments in history and their relationship to contemporary acts of violence in the United States.

    “Large-scale art projects often solicit proposals from individuals or teams that already have a history of working in similar capacities,” said Corona. “We are elated, in our short careers, to have

    the opportunity to carry out such an ambitious commission. It is the most significant one for us so far, and we hope to create a path toward the sustainable production of future large-scale projects.”

    According to Corona and Pinkston, Light Happenings II takes into account the complex history and public art found on and around the installation site. Particularly considering the Civil War trail and the 9/11 World Trade Center Memorial, as well as acknowledging the role that the Inner Harbor port served in the transatlantic slave trade— where “between 1815 and 1860, traders in Baltimore made the port one of the leading disembarkation points for ships carrying slaves to New Orleans and other ports in the deep South”.

    “In the face of such earthly horrors, we ask the question: What Gives You Light?” said Corona and Pinkston.

    The installation consists of three structures using steel, Plexiglas, paint, vinyl, LED lights, projections and video. The interactive installation will include audience participation and live performances by regional and national performance artists. Both Pinkston and Hoesy will be among the performance artists, which will also include Alexander D’Agostino (Baltimore), Nicoletta De La Brown (Baltimore), Ayana Evans (New York), Bobby English Jr. (California), and Tsedaye MaKonnen (Washington, DC)."

  • Labbodies in Bmore Art!

    Labbodies in Bmore Art!
  • Labbodies in Baltimore Magazine!

    Labbodies in Baltimore Magazine!
  • Labbodies in the Baltimore FishBowl!

    Labbodies in the Baltimore FishBowl!

    Baltimore Fishbowl

    "Light Happenings Part II,” by Baltimore performance art group Labbodies, is a resurrection of the first rendition from last year’s inaugural festival. These structures contain historical themes aglow with neon, to “examine some of the most tragic moments in history and their connection to contemporary acts of violence in the United States,” per Light City’s website."

  • Labbodies makes Top 5 installations at Soup of the Day!

    Labbodies makes Top 5 installations at Soup of the Day!
  • Labbodies awarded a Grit Fund Grant 2017distributed by The Contemporary Museum

    Labbodies awarded a Grit Fund Grant 2017distributed by The Contemporary Museum

    www.contemporary.org/gritfund/ The Contemporary|

    The Contemporary is pleased to announce the third round of grantees of the Grit Fund. In 2017, the Grit Fund received over 70 applications and awarded $55,250 to 11 projects with grants ranging from $3,000 to $6,000. Awards were determined by a five-person jury of local and national arts leaders: Cameron Shaw (New Orleans, LA), Carolyn Lazard (Philadephia, PA), Khadija Nia Adell (Baltimore, MD), Kris Kuramitsu (Los Angeles, CA), and Melissa Webb (Baltimore, MD). The Contemporary would like to congratulate this year’s grantees: A Revolutionary Summer Publications; Baltimore’s Gifted Shop & Sip Exhibition; Blush + Brews; Close Up Baltimore; Extant Arts; Kidult Presents: Outside the Box with Abu the Flutemaker; LabBodies Performance Art Review III: Freedom; NONUMENT 01: The McKeldin Fountain; Refugee Youth Publishing Workshops; Secret Psychic Cinema’s Season 3 Programming; and WOO Windows.


    LabBodies Performance Art Review III: Freedom

    LabBodies Performance Art Review III: Freedom by Ashley DeHoyos, Ada Pinkston, and Hoesy Corona; funded $6000. LabBodies Performance Art Review III: Freedom will be the third iteration of LabBodies annual performance art festival. This program began in 2015 when organizers saw a need to create a space for local artists to examine the socio-political pressure that comes from the boundaries of race, class, gender, and power in the United States of America. The festival provides a platform for artists that exist on the margins to present their work in a supportive environment. The Grit Fund supports general operating and the production and presentation of the third year of the festival.

  • Hoesy Corona in Recharging the Canon at The Walters Art Museum

    Hoesy Corona in Recharging the Canon at The Walters Art Museum

    BMORE ART

    The Walters Art Museum
    600 North Charles Street : 21201

    Free, advance registration requested

    LabBodies, a Baltimore-based laboratory for performance art, brings new works created for the Walters the museum’s Sculpture Court and Ancient World galleries. These spectacular and colorful interventions connect ancient art with contemporary questions about race, religion, gender, and identity.

    This one night, two person performance features new work by multimedia artists Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston in response to the collections housed in the galleries. Pinkston’s From God’s Name to No Namewill lead viewers in a ritualized procession through the galleries, while Corona’s Nobodies Gala will act as a quinciañera celebration, or fifteenth anniversary, of his longest ongoing performance Hoesy, and highlight the museum’s Mexican earthenware collection.

  • Hoesy Corona artist talk at The Queens Museum

    Hoesy Corona artist talk at The Queens Museum

    Queens Museum

    The first program dedicated to the discussion and exploration of various themes in Performance Art, TALKaCTIVE, begins season series with the presentations of “Performance and Associations.” This month conversation focuses on aspects of associative creation, relational experiences, collaborative undertakings, and exploration of communal performative actions. Featured artists work, reference, investigate, and explore modalities of connection with and among peers and with the public. The presentation of documentation of works will be followed by a panel conversation and Q&A with attending audience.
    Participating Artists: Beatriz Albuquerque (Portugal), Hoesy Corona (Mexico), Jenna Kline (United States), and Verónica Peña (Spain).

    Moderated by curator: Hector Canonge.

  • Hoesy Corona | TalkActive, performance art talk series | The Queens Museum

    Hoesy Corona | TalkActive, performance art talk series | The Queens Museum

    TALKaCTIVE: performance art conversation series
    "Performance and Associations"
    Sunday, March 19, 2017, 2:00 - 5:00 PM
    Hosted at the QUEENS MUSEUM

    The first program dedicated to the discussion and exploration of various themes in Performance Art, TALKaCTIVE, begins season series with the presentations of “Performance and Associations.” This month conversation focuses on aspects of associative creation, relational experiences, collaborative undertakings, and exploration of communal performative actions. Featured artists work, reference, investigate, and explore modalities of connection with and among peers and with the public. The presentation of documentation of works will be followed by a panel conversation and Q&A with attending audience.

    Participating Artists: Beatriz Albuquerque (Portugal), Hoesy Corona (Mexico), Jenna Kline (United States), and Verónica Peña (Spain).
    Moderated by curator: Hector Canonge

  • Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston (Labbodies) to perform at the Walters Art Museum

    Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston (Labbodies) to perform at the Walters Art Museum

    Baltimore Magazine

    Labbodies Presents Recharging the Canon
    March 23, The Walters Art Museum, 600 N. Charles St. This Baltimore-based laboratory for performance art brings new works created for the Walters’ sculpture court and ancient world galleries. These interventions connect ancient art with contemporary questions about race, religion, gender, and identity. Ada Pinkston’s From God’s Name to No Name will lead viewers in a ritualized procession through the galleries, while Hoesy Corona’s Nobodies Gala will act as a quinciañera celebration and highlight the museum’s Mexican earthenware collection.

  • Hoesy Corona opens up his studio for Mera Rubell (Rubell Collection) and Chris Bedford (Baltimore Museum of Art) and BmoreArt

    Hoesy Corona opens up his studio for Mera Rubell (Rubell Collection) and Chris Bedford (Baltimore Museum of Art) and BmoreArt

    "A few months ago I was asked to plan a studio tour for Christopher Bedford, the new director of the Baltimore Museum of Art, and Mera Rubell, an internationally respected collector and founding partner of the Rubell Family Collection, a Miami-based museum. The goal was simple: introduce Chris and Mera to a diverse range Baltimore artists and studio spaces through as authentic a means possible. We selected twenty-two studio visits for two days, February 28 and March 1, traversing from Highlandtown to Federal Hill to Hampden to Station North, squeezing in time for the occasional coffee, snack, and cocktail in between.

    “I found the experience stirring and inspiring and I look forward to continuing a meaningful engagement with the local artist community,” said Bedford after the tour. “Our twenty-two studio visits were a forceful demonstration that artists in Baltimore are responding with intelligence and determination to the specifics of our social context, using their creative acumen to advocate for inclusivity and social justice in a city where those values are more pressing than most.”

    “I was impressed with much of the work that I saw, but also with the strength and support in the art community in Baltimore,” said Rubell. “The artists have such an amazing network here. Baltimore is an inspiring place to be an artist and I was thrilled for the opportunity to visit their studios.” "

    BMOREART WEB

  • Hoesy Corona selected as a SemiFinalist for the Janet and Walter Sondheim Prize

    Hoesy Corona selected as a SemiFinalist for the Janet and Walter Sondheim Prize

    |http://www.artscape.org/visual-arts/visual-arts-detail/1091|ARTSCAPE | SONDHEIM PRIZE 2017|

    The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts announces the semifinalists for the 12th annual Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. The competition awards a $25,000 fellowship to assist in furthering the career of a visual artist or visual artist collaborators living and working in the Greater Baltimore region. For 2017, 36 individual artists have been selected as semifinalists.


    2017 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize Semifinalists

    Mequitta Ahuja, Baltimore, MD

    Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

    Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

    Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

    Heather Clark, Leesburg, VA

    Shannon Collis, Lutherville, MD

    Hoesy Corona, Baltimore, MD

    Rachel Debuque, Riverdale Park, MD

    Sara Dittrich, Baltimore, MD

    Selina Doroshenko, Baltimore, MD

    Tim Doud, Washington, DC

    Mary Early, Washington, DC

    Colin Foster, Baltimore, MD

    Emily Francisco, Washington, DC

    Bryan Funk, Baltimore, MD

    Tatiana Gulenkina, Washington, DC

    Cadeatra Harvey, Baltimore, MD

    Muriel Hasbun, Silver Spring, MD

    Taha Heydari, Baltimore, MD

    Ricardo Hoegg, Baltimore, MD

    Benjamin Kelley, Baltimore, MD

    Travis Levasseur, Baltimore, MD

    Nathaniel Lewis, Washington, DC

    Giulia Livi, Baltimore, MD

    Kelly Lloyd, Baltimore, MD

    Bruce McKaig, Baltimore, MD

    Scott Pennington, Baltimore, MD

    Paul Rucker, Baltimore, MD

    James Singewald, Baltimore, MD

    Julia Smith, Baltimore, MD

    Dan Steinhilber, Washington, DC

    Kyle Tata, Baltimore, MD

    Katya Vilano, Baltimore, MD

    Jessica Walton, Baltimore, MD

    Xiaofu Wang, Baltimore, MD

    Amy Yee, Baltimore, MD

    The Sondheim Artscape Prize is held in conjunction with the annual Artscape juried exhibition and produced with the Walters Art Museum and the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA). Approximately six finalists are selected for the final review for the prize. Their work is showcased at the Walters Art Museum from Saturday, June 17 through Sunday, August 13, 2017. Additionally, an exhibition of the semifinalists’ work is shown in the Decker and Meyerhoff galleries of MICA on Friday, July 21 through Sunday, August 6, 2017. An opening reception for the semifinalist exhibition takes place Thursday, July 20, 2017 from 6pm to 9pm at MICA, located at 1303 W. Mount Royal Avenue.

    The fellowship winner is selected from the Walters Art Museum exhibition after review of the installed art and an interview with each finalist by the jurors. Jurors for 2017 include Curator at the SculptureCenter in Long Island City Ruba Katrib, New York-based contemporary artist Clifford Owens, and Curator at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Musuem Nat Trotman.

  • Labbodies selected as featured artists for Light City 2017

    Labbodies selected as featured artists for Light City 2017

    Artist: Labbodies
    Baltimore, MD

    Building on their 2016 Neighborhood Lights project in Station North, Light Happenings Part II is a site-specific multimedia installation and performance by lead artists Ada Pinkston and Hoesy Corona. The interactive installation will be activated with audience participation and live performances by regional and national performance artists. Light Happenings Part II will examine some of the most tragic moments in history and their connection to contemporary acts of violence in the United States. In the face of such earthly horror, the question remains: Where Is Your Lighthouse?

    About the artist: Returning to Light City for the second year, Lab Bodies is a performance art laboratory based in Baltimore, Maryland that provides a format for artists working in the arena of performance art to exhibit their work. Last year they launched the annual performance art review Borders Boundaries and Barricades to highlight the growing regional performance art community. Since January 2014, Labbodies has been under the direction of founding co-directors Ada Pinkston and Hoesy Corona.

    Photo: Dark City by Labbodies, photo by Carly J Bales

    Light City 2017

  • Labbodies | The Walters Art Museum | Recharging the Canon

    Labbodies | The Walters Art Museum | Recharging the Canon

    Labbodies presents Recharging the Canon at The Walters Art Museum

    DATE
    Thursday, March 23, 2017

    TIME
    07:00 PM–08:30 PM

    This one night, two person performance features new work by multimedia artists Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston in response to the collections housed in the Walters’ Sculpture Court, Egyptian galleries, and Ancient Near East galleries. Pinkston’s From God’s Name to No Name will lead viewers in a ritualized procession through the galleries, while Corona’s Nododies Gala will act as a quincianera celebration of his longest ongoing performance Hoesy, and highlight the museum’s Mexican earthenware collection.

  • Big Table Connections| Body in Contemporary Art at the BMA | featuring Hoesy Corona

    Big Table Connections| Body in Contemporary Art at the BMA | featuring Hoesy Corona

    Hoesy Corona's performance still from "Scapegoat Monument", 2014 has been 3-d printed and transformed into a traditional fashion plate!

    Next time you visit The Baltimore Museum of Art be sure to stop by the Big Table Connections and try out the Fashion Plate Hack activity!

  • Maryland Art Place | UNDER500 | featuring Hoesy Corona

    Maryland Art Place |  UNDER500 | featuring Hoesy Corona

    Maryland Art Place invites you to join us at our fourth annual "Under $500" affordable art sale this December! On Friday, December 9 at 7 o'clock join us for a first-come, first-served opportunity to purchase affordable and original works of art. The event will feature the work of Baltimore and surrounding area artists at a price point of $500 or less. Purchase work at any point throughout the evening and take home that night!

    FEATURED ARTISTS:

    Michel Anderson, Kyle Bauer, Amy Boone McCreesh, Amanda Burnham, Jon Carhart, Josh Chance, Hoesy Corona, Bonnie Crawford Kotula, Teresa Duggan, Annie Farrar, Maria-Theresa Fernandes, Aubrey Garwood, Vin Grabill, Mia Halton, Sara Havekotte, Gregory Hein, Dana Holgerson, Glen Kessler, Seo Kim, Minas Konsolas, Carmen Martini, Antonio McAfee, Cara Ober, Lydia Pettit, Jan Razauskas, Wil Scott, Ginebra Shay, James Singewald, Victor Torres, Emily Uchytil, Jessie Unterhalter, Katey Truhn, Alice Valenti, Sylvie Van Helden, Emily Waters, Laddie Waters, Richard Paul Weiblinger, and Dominique Zeltzman.

    Maryland Art Place

  • Hoesy Corona appears in Emergency Index 2016

    Hoesy Corona appears in Emergency Index 2016

    emergencyindex.com/

    available for pre-order at their website!

  • Hoesy Corona in City Paper's Power Rankings

    Hoesy Corona in City Paper's Power Rankings

    "Hoesy Corona, an independent artist and one half of performance art curatorial duo LabBodies. The Rubys help these artists and writers see through specific projects with up to $10,000 in funding. We can't wait to see what they do."

    Baltimore City Paper

  • Hoesy Corona Awarded a Ruby's Project Grant 2016 in Visual Arts

    Hoesy Corona Awarded a Ruby's Project Grant 2016 in Visual Arts

    Hoesy Corona is the recipient of a Ruby's Project Grant 2016 in the Visual Arts category to support the development and creation of new wearable sculptures for Alie[N]ation, an immersive multimedia installation and performance that investigates and dismantles hyperbolized alien tropes, xenophobic language, and the archetype of the scapegoat.



    Ruby's Project Grant Visual Arts 2016

  • Hoesy Corona's practice profiled by Visit Pittsburgh

    Hoesy Corona's practice profiled by Visit Pittsburgh

    Hoesy Corona is a multidisciplinary artist and founding co-director of Labbodies, a performance art laboratory in Baltimore Maryland. During his time here, Hoesy immersed himself in the Pittsburgh community, building relationships and creating thought-provoking multidisciplinary art. Hoesy will be returning to Pittsburgh as a part of the Re:NEW Festival this fall.

    When asked what his favorite part about Pittsburgh is, this is what he said: "I loved my time in Pittsburgh this past May as the Cafe Con Leche Latinx Resident Artist at Most Wanted Fine Art Gallery! The city has a strong local arts community and a rich cultural history, as well as an active series of urban renewal redevelopments. Highlights include the Cafe con Leche Sobremesa dinners, The Gallery Crawl, and the Strip District on the weekends! During my stay I also visited tons of art exhibitions across the city including those at The Carnegie Museum of Art, Boom Concepts, Bunker Projects, Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, The Andy Warhol Museum, The Mattress Factory, Artist Image Resource, and The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust downtown galleries." To learn more about Hoesy's time in Pittsburgh and how you can see him at the Re:NEW Festival check out this blog post.

    Visit Pittsburgh

  • Hoesy Corona's Nobodies Gala in the Pittsburgh City Paper

    Hoesy Corona's Nobodies Gala in the Pittsburgh City Paper

    "On Oct. 8, on the grounds of East Liberty Presbyterian Church, Baltimore’s Hoesy Corona presents two performances of Nobodies Gala, a short work inviting viewers to join in “nobodying,” the act of “making somebody, nobody.”"

    PGH City Paper

  • Upcoming: Hoesy Corona Solo Show in Milwaukee!

    Upcoming: Hoesy Corona Solo Show in Milwaukee!

    Two solo shows featuring artists: Hoesy Corona and Niki Kriese

    Just Space
    Sept 28th-Novermber 7th 2016

    www.piuspac.org/gallery/just-space/ Just Space|

  • Hoesy sits down with Cafe con Leche for an interview!

    Hoesy sits down with Cafe con Leche for an interview!

    "Describe the art work you created while in Pittsburgh.
    Throughout the course of my month long creative residency I fully immersed myself in the inquiry: what does it mean to be a Latinx in a place where there are few Latinxs? and produced work that emerged from my observations. My choice of media ranged from cut vinyl on clear film, acrylic on plastic, as well as performance and video.

    The first week, I produced decal compositions of men and women mowing lawns, building houses and cleaning.

    The second week I produced a series of graphic vinyl compositions that portrayed ‘aliens’. The last two weeks I fully developed my new series titled "White Constructions" where I explore notions around the calculated construction of race as it pertains to US-centric power structures. This series explores the deliberate construction of race in North America and the strategic placement of white identities as superior to the rest. In White Constructions I limit my materials to the word 'white' cut from black vinyl on a clear surface. My hope is that these constructions make a complex topic visible and encourage a timely conversation around the social construction of race and the social ramifications for people of color.

    During my last 3 days in Pittsburgh I also performed “Nobody in Pittsburgh” throughout the Garfield neighborhood and documented some of my outings to later translate those documents into short videos. This performance is part of my ongoing series “The Nobodies” (2009-present) where I explore what it means to be a disenfranchised member of society in North America by embodying the abstract concept of ‘nobody’. In these performances I invite audience members to play a part in the act of nobodying, an operation that consists of making somebody, nobody. “Nothing” all of a sudden becomes individualized, becomes body and eyes becomes no one."

    www.cafeconlechepgh.com/azucar/2016/8/1… Cafe Con Leche|

  • Hoesy Corona to perform at Transformer, DC

    Hoesy Corona to perform at Transformer, DC

    Defy/Define

    September 17 – October 22, 2016

    Opening Reception: Saturday, September 17, 6-8pm
    Saturday, October 15 , 7-8:45pm: Transformer, a performance by Hoesy Corona

    Transformer launches our 15th Exhibition Season with Defy/Define, presenting the work of a select group of emerging visual artists exploring issues of identity through photography, video, and performance art.

    Featuring works by Ebtisam Abdulaziz, Eli Barak, Jason Barnes for Noir Creative, Jo Ann Block, Nakeya Brown, Hoesy Corona , Alexandra "Rex" Delafkaran, Kunj, and Renee Regan, Defy/Define seeks to address intersectionality within struggles to have racial, ethnic, cultural, sexual, and gender identities understood & accepted.

    "Transformer is proud to be launching our 15th Exhibition Season with work by artists who defy stereotypes and examine how we define ourselves in a time of tumultuous social and political change." - Victoria Reis, Executive & Artistic Director; Co-Founder, Transformer

    Transformer DC

  • Hoesy reflects on The Artist Retreat 2016!

    Hoesy reflects on The Artist Retreat 2016!

    BMORE ART

    "Artist Hoesy Corona took it a step further, coining a new catch phrase for artists in Baltimore. “There is no such thing as “smalltimore” we are BaltiMORE!” He also was pleased to be introduced to so many powerful and diverse Baltimore based artists that he didn’t know before"
    -Hoesy Corona

    "“The Contemporary Museum is taking creative risks where they matter,” said Hoesy Corona. “They are investing in the longevity of local artists careers and by default benefiting the national and international creative landscape.”
    -Hoesy Corona

  • Labbodies + Creative Mornings Baltimore = Success!

    Labbodies + Creative Mornings Baltimore = Success!

    THANK YOU!!! CREATIVE MORNING BALTIMORE for hosting the Labbodies Doctors!

  • Labbodies + Creative Mornings = WEIRD | BMORE ART PICK!

    Labbodies + Creative Mornings = WEIRD | BMORE ART PICK!

    BMORE ART

    Creative Mornings Baltimore hosts Labbodies!!!
    JOIN US FRIDAY 8/19 from 8:30-10am at Penthouse Gallery (Copycat Building)

  • Labbodies highlighted on City Paper

    Labbodies highlighted on City Paper

    Looking forward to Creative Mornings Baltimore this Friday August 19th 2016 from 8:30am-10am at Penthouse Gallery! FREE! with complimentary breakfast and coffee!


    "in the city home to John Waters and other, lesser-known practicioners of the unusual, it's hard to know what the word "weird" really means, if anything at all. But if anyone can approach some kind of definition, it might be Labbodies, a performance art curatorial project based in Baltimore."
    -Maura Callahan

  • Labbodies Performance Art Review 2016 | part 2 in BmoreArt

    Labbodies Performance Art Review 2016 | part 2 in BmoreArt

    Labbodies Performance Art Review 2016 (part 2) reviewed by BMORE ART

    "I witnessed surreal repetition, freaky sexy hurt, and transformative meditations on migration and loss. I watched the consumption of indigestible whiteness. I pinned wings to the body of a bloody swan. Every night required audience participation; an interactive engagement and conscious observation with performances that contextualized the rally cries of our generation, and the stories that stretch beyond the borders of the charm. What follows are quick thoughts and rambles. Fleeting points of inspiration or images that stuck with me from the performances I was able to witness."

    BMORE ART

  • Creative Mornings Baltimore: WEIRD | Labbodies (Hoesy Corona & Ada Pinkston)

    Creative Mornings Baltimore: WEIRD | Labbodies (Hoesy Corona & Ada Pinkston)

    Excited to be a guest at Creative Mornings Baltimore! August 19th 2016 8:30Am at Penthouse Gallery!

    CREATIVE MORNINGS

  • Labbodies Performance Art Review 2016 | reviewed in BmoreArt

    Labbodies Performance Art Review 2016 | reviewed in BmoreArt



    BMORE ART

    History, Family, Weapons: Sin and Innocence
    BONNIE CRAWFORD KOTULA
    AUGUST 10, 2016

    "Part 1: July 28

    Retrospective: A Performance Art Review presented by Labbodies at Spacecamp was the second annual event of its kind. Over four evenings, twenty artists enacted performances that had previously been presented in and around Baltimore. Seven additional artists’ work was represented through installations of ephemera and documentation of previous performances.

    On the second night of Labbodies’ Performance Art Review, curators Ada Pinkston and Hoesy Corona presented five unique performances by five different performers that dealt with histories, personal family narratives, civil war era weaponry, and concepts of sin and innocence.

    I found it noteworthy that the curators’ selection of performances that evening were by women artists who were predominantly of European descent, where all of the pieces took place in proximity to installations of performance ephemera, much of which was racially charged.
    The objects and videos that comprised the installations provided a context for the performances in which the usually invisible whiteness of the performers was foregrounded through its contrast to the physical environment, hinting at other performances happening on the other three nights...."

  • Nobodies Gala by Hoesy Corona at the Re:New Festival in Pittsburgh this fall!

    Nobodies Gala by Hoesy Corona at the Re:New Festival in Pittsburgh this fall!

    Excited to return to Pittsburgh in the fall for Re:New Festival-- where I will debut a new performance featuring 8 performers!!!


    "Nobodies Gala is a two-part performance by multidisciplinary artist Hoesy Corona and an exploration into what it means to be a disenfranchised member of society in North America. Corona makes colorful sculptural garments fitted to the human body that enable otherworldly experiences for the viewer. In Nobodies Gala the artist invites viewers to play a part in the act of ‘Nobodying’, an operation that consists of making somebody, nobody.

    This performance is being presented in conjunction with the VIA Festival.

    There will be two performances: a 20-minute performance in early afternoon, and a 40-minute performance in the evening. These performances will be outdoors, near the East Liberty Presbyterian Church.

    RE:NEW FESTIVAL

  • Hoesy Corona featured on Pittsburgh's NPR station

    Hoesy Corona featured on Pittsburgh's NPR station

    Check this radio segment out! I speak about my experience as an artist in residence with Cafe Con Leche and Most Wanted Fine Art in Pittsburgh this past May!

    WESA FM NPR

    "For more than two years, Café Con Leche has promoted Latino artists and culture in Pittsburgh.

    It also hosts an artist-in-residency program.

    “Art is a language and I think that it doesn’t necessarily function in the same way that our spoken language does,” said multimedia artist Hoesy Corona. “Which means that it can really enter us in a different way.”

    Corona exhibited his work in Pittsburgh as the resident artist in May. He’s based in Baltimore, Md. and for his artist residency focused on the question of what it means to be a Latino in a place where there are few Latinos.

    “I hope that exposing people, especially in Pittsburgh, to different kinds of cultures and food and art, that we as a region can really start to reflect the changes in the demographic of the country,” said Cafe Con Leche Founder Tara Sherry-Torres.

    Boris Balsindes Urquiola is the artist-in-residence for August. His work will be exhibited at events at Most Wanted Fine Art in Garfield throughout the month.

  • LABBODIES reviewed by Art F City!

    LABBODIES reviewed by Art F City!

    Labbodies presents
    White Guilt Confessional
    a solo exhibition by April Danielle Lewis
    at the Artist Run Art Fair 2016
    during Baltimore's Artscape

    ART F CITY:

    "Paddy: So, the elephant in the room: “The White Guilt Confessional Booth” by April Danielle Lewis. Art fairs are usually filled with white people, which provides at least sizable pool of potential participants. According to the curator, Hoesy Corona, who is stationed outside the frame of this picture and well away from the booth, people approach the confessional in the same way. They look to see if someone is actually behind the booth, see that there is, and do one of three things: walk away, talk to him, or use the booth.

    I spoke to Corona and read some of the literature about how “unhealthy white guilt promotes a privileged refusal to engage in conversations and actions about race for fear of feeling bad”. I didn’t use the booth. It wasn’t about fear of feeling or that I don’t have any white guilt to share. Given that I’d already decided that not writing about the piece would be its own kind of racism, I really wanted to have an actual experience to share. But ultimately, the booth was nowhere near private enough for me to feel comfortable doing so. We’ve all said and done things related to our privilege that have made us ashamed. Those kinds of memories don’t get shared in an open room for everyone to hear.

    Michael: But increasingly, it seems like white guilt has become the very publicly-traded currency of art discourse in Baltimore. Which makes the confessional an interesting object, because it both acknowledges that what we refer to as “identity” is about performing a somewhat scripted ritual and draws a parallel to “original sin”. Religions exact their power from the message that there’s something inherently wrong with humanity, and that often aligns with how people conceptualize race—from a “Chosen People” to “The Mark of Cain”. We haven’t yet been prescribed any one secular panacea for the myriad sins-of-the-father we inherit these days, but it’s sadly not likely to be as simple as saying a dozen Hail Marys and eating magic bread—or even lopping off one’s foreskin. I guess that’s why I also didn’t use it."

    ART F CITY

  • SCHOOL 33 | PERFORMANCE ART PANEL

    SCHOOL 33 | PERFORMANCE ART PANEL

    Excited to participate in this panel discussion around performance art at School 33 in conjunction with the current show: Shape Shifters, curated by Melissa Webb.
    the event is free and open to the public! hope you can join us!


    " The June 11 event will feature performances by Civin and Bobby English Jr two of the artist in the show , and a panel discussion featuring Laure Drogoul, Alessandra Torres, Leslie Rogers, and Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston of Labbodies performance art laboratory, as well as the artists and curator of Shape Shifters."

  • Hoesy Corona appears in Hyrsteria magazine

    Hoesy Corona appears in Hyrsteria magazine

    Excited to have one of my paintings appear in the first issue of Hyrsteria Zine!
    My painting "The Uninvited Guest" is a response to Henry Miller's poem "The Uninvited Guests".

    HYRSTERIA is a zine that highlights the social differences that challenge us in our day-to-day lives— gender, race, class, sexuality, ability, age, and culture. It is a testimony of truth, fiction, and everything in-between while addressing struggle and oppression in it’s various forms. These stories, investigations, and artworks are written and illustrated by folks who are, for the most part, based in Baltimore. We hope this very first issue inspires you and connects you to the narratives and experiences of others.

    www.hyrsteria.com/

  • Creative Capital : On Our Radar 2016 : Hoesy Corona

    Creative Capital : On Our Radar 2016 : Hoesy Corona

    Honored to have one of my projects selected for Creative Capital's On Our Radar 2016. I am in good company with Baltimore's FORCE:Upsetting Rape Culture and Laure Drogoul!


    Creative Capital On Our Radar 2016

  • "Mother Scapegoat" on Paddle8 | WPA DC

    "Mother Scapegoat" on Paddle8 | WPA DC

    Acquire this beautiful headdress from my original performance "Mother Death Life Mama" performed at The Baltimore Museum of Art in 2012.

    "Mother Scapegoat" on Paddle8
    as part of the Washington Project for the Arts Auction Gala 2016. Bidding closes on Saturday April 9th at 10:10PM.

    SOLD

  • The Dark Lab | April 1-2 2016

    The Dark Lab | April 1-2 2016

    The Dark Lab, curated by Station North’s artists-in-residence Ada Pinkston and Hoesy Corona, is a series of public programs that will take place in Station North throughout February, March and April 2016 in conjunction with Light City's Neighborhood Lights. During their residency, Pinkston and Corona will build off of Labbodies, a performance art laboratory based in Station North and directed by the artists, in order to host the Light Research Kiosk, a series of research pop-up performances which collect conversational interviews with individuals based around the question, “What gives you Light?” The research collected will be interpreted by the artists into Dark City, a temporary installation on Penn Station Plaza. In addition to their Light Research Kiosk and occupation of Penn Station Plaza, Pinkston and Corona will continue their Solo Labs, a series of curated exhibitions around ephemeral and new media works, with a solo show by award winning duo Wickerham & Lomax at Terrault Contemporary.

    Dark Lab Schedule
    February - March, 2016: ​Light Research Kiosk pop-up performances throughout the Station North Arts & Entertainment District

    Firday, April 1st, 2016: The opening of Dark City @ Penn Station Plaza, on view from 5:00-10:00PM with performances from 7:00-10:00PM.

    Saturday, April 2nd, 2016: The opening of Uncool by Wickerham & Lomax @ Terrault Contemporary, 7:00-10:00PM

    Friday, April 8th, 2016: Uncool by Wickerham & Lomax reception @ Terrault Contemporary & Dark City closing @ Penn Station Plaza, 7:00 - 10:00PM in conjunction with Alloverstreet!

    www.stationnorth.org/projects/darklab

  • Washington Project for the Arts Auction Gala 2016

    Washington Project for the Arts Auction Gala 2016

    I am honored that curator Kimberly Gladfelter Graham selected me as one of the artists for this yea's WPA Auction Gala in Washington DC!

    Details:
    GALA
    Saturday, April 9, 2016, 7-11pm

    OPENING RECEPTION
    Thursday, March 31, 2016

    WPA AUCTION WEEK
    Friday, April 1 - Friday, April 8, 2016

    Curator:
    Kimberly Gladfelter Ghraham

    Artists:
    Damon Arhos
    Hoesy Corona
    Regina DeLuise
    David East
    Annie Farrar
    Suzy Kopf
    Nate Larson & Marni Shindleman
    Mike McKee
    Gerald Ross
    J. Alex Schechter
    Joyce J. Scott
    Leslie Shellow
    Sylvie van Helden

    WPA.com

  • Baltimore Sun | Light City | Labbodies 2016

    Baltimore Sun | Light City | Labbodies 2016

    Check out The Baltimore Sun for details on Light City's Labbodies | The Dark Lab in Station North!! April 1st and April 2nd 2016!

    www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/ligh…

  • Cafe con Leche Latino Artist Residency May 2016

    Cafe con Leche Latino Artist Residency May 2016

    I am excited to have been selected by Cafe con Leche and Most Wanted Fine Art Gallery as an Artist in Residence! I will be spending the month of May in Pittsburgh investigating what it means to be a latino (artist ) in a place where there are few latinos.

    www.NextPittsburgh.com

    #hoesycorona#artistresidency#cafeconleche#mostwantedfineartgallery#pittsburgh#air#latinoartist

  • Queer Threads | an Intersectional Dialogue | Decker Gallery 2016

    Queer Threads | an Intersectional Dialogue | Decker Gallery 2016

    Looking forward to this conversation!!

  • Baltimore Magazine | Artists to Watch Feb 2016

    Baltimore Magazine | Artists to Watch Feb 2016

    Thank You Baltimore Magazine for the Artist to Watch Shout Out in the To The Future issue Feb 2016.

    www.baltimoremagazine.net/2016/2/22/to-…

  • Light City | Labbodies | The Dark Lab | Station North 2016

    Light City | Labbodies | The Dark Lab | Station North 2016

    STATION NORTH: THE DARK LAB
    Artist: LabBodies, comprised of artists Ada Pinkston and Hoesy Corona

    Openings:

    “Dark City” by LabBodies
    Penn Station Plaza
    Friday, April 1st
    Installation on view 5-10pm
    Performance 7pm – 10pm

    “Uncool” by Wickerham & Lomax
    Terrault Contemporary
    1515 Guilford Ave
    Saturday, April 2nd
    Reception 7-10PM

    LabBodies presents “The Dark Lab,” a bilateral contemporary art exhibition showcasing the work of artist duos: Ada Pinkston & Hoesy Corona (“Dark City,” a public installation at Penn Station Plaza) and Wickerham & Lomax (“Uncool” at Terrault Contemporary). The duos’ work seeks to find out what gives Station North residents, commuters and ambulatory passersby light. Their inquiry comes two hundred years since the Baltimore streets were the first in the country to be illuminated by the gas lamppost and just one year since the national media spotlight left the very same streets effervescent following the tragic death of Freddie Gray.

    lightcity.org/art-and-performance/neigh…

  • Baltimore Museum of Art | Big Table Connections 2015

    Baltimore Museum of Art | Big Table Connections 2015

    I am very much looking forward to engaging with audiences around the great work new BMA acquisition "The Artist who swallowed the world whole while it was still a disk" by artist Erwin Wurm!

    artbma.org/events/2015-05-12.big.table

  • City Paper | Best of 2015 | Best Mad Scientists

    City Paper | Best of 2015 | Best Mad Scientists

    YESS!! Named Best Mad Scientists by City Paper!!!

    Local multidisciplinary artists Ada Pinkston and Hoesy Corona—Dr. A. Pinkston and Dr. H. Corona, as they call themselves—formed the performance-art curatorial project LabBodies just last year and already have several solo and group shows behind them, not to mention a two-week-long multivenue performance-art festival. Usually wearing white lab coats, the two doctors let their self-proclaimed “social experiment” unfold in galleries and public pop-up spaces, bringing diverse performers to storefronts, Artscape, and the Baltimore Museum of Art. At their events we experienced immersive and interactive installations, stimulating visual dialogues on race and gender, and actual buckets of blood.

    www.citypaper.com/bob/2015/bcpnews-best…

  • Greenbelt Center Gallery 2015

    Greenbelt Center Gallery 2015

    If you are close to Greenbelt check out my exhibition at The Greenbelt Center Gallery!

    greenbeltlaborday.com/events-and-activi…

  • Baltimore Style | Mad Scientists 2015

    Baltimore Style | Mad Scientists 2015

    Thank you Baltimore Style for the Shoutout!!

    MAD SCIENTISTS
    Would you pay $3 to feed a Chipwich to a clown? That was the question posed by a performance art troupe to  Skinnygirl Bethenny Frankel at the Select art show in Miami. (She said yes, by the way.) I don’t usually take my cultural cues from the “Real Housewives,” but the recent episode reminded me that I haven’t taken many risks lately when it comes to attending performances that are experimental, ephemeral or completely unpredictable.

    If you’re also looking to experiment, check in with “the doctors”—a.k.a. Ada Pinkston and Hoesy Corona (who go by Dr. A. Pinkston and Dr. H. Corona), who cofounded LabBodies in 2014. Each month, the social artists host “Lab Nights” where you can watch curated pieces followed by open-mic-style works-in-progress by local and visiting artists around town. Also keep your eyes peeled for LabBodies pop-upsin public spaces. They may even show up at your house! Well, on demand. Corona and Pinkston hope to launch a “Performance Art Pay-Per-View” service next year. labbodies.com

    baltimorestyle.com/13169/culture-club/

  • What Weekly | School 33 | Featured Artist 2015

    What Weekly | School 33 | Featured Artist 2015

    "I spent the first six years of my life in a paradise of thick greens and fruiting trees before emigrating to the United States. Having left my home country at a formative age I am what has been coined a Third Culture Kid, a displaced young person who developed the faculty to embody and move through multiple cultures at once. First is my Mexican culture, colorful even when doleful, second is my American culture, strategic and confident, and third is the amalgamation of the two: Hoesy."


    www.whatweekly.com/2015/10/30/school-33…

  • Force: The Monument Quilt announces AIR 2015

    Force: The Monument Quilt announces AIR 2015

    Hoesy Corona and Ada Pinkston awarded the Pelham Printmaking Artist Residency in Lithography!!

    themonumentquilt.org/ada-pinkston-and-h…

  • What Weekly | Interview 2015

    What Weekly | Interview 2015

    Check out this What Weekly interview following our Performance Art Festival | Borders Boundaries and Barricades 2015.

    www.whatweekly.com/2015/07/09/borders-b…

  • Bmore Art | Interview 2015

    Bmore Art | Interview 2015

    Check out a recent interview for Bmore Art!

    bmoreart.com/2015/06/they-sing-the-body…

  • The Walters Art Museum | Slow Art Day 2015

    The Walters Art Museum | Slow Art Day 2015

    Glad to contribute a selection for this years Slow Art Day at The Walter's Art Museum

    articles.thewalters.org/slowartday-artw…

  • Huffington Post | FAWC Kalup Linzy 2015

    Huffington Post | FAWC Kalup Linzy 2015

    Had a blast spending a whole week with the amazing Kalup Linzy at The Fine Art Works Center in Provincetown!!!

    www.huffingtonpost.com/kalup-linzy/one-…

  • City Paper | Labbodies Interview 2015

    City Paper | Labbodies Interview 2015

    Check out this interview with Ada Pinkston and I in Baltimore's City Paper!

    www.citypaper.com/arts/stage/bcpnews-bu…

  • Baltimore Museum of Art | Party of the Century 2014!

    Baltimore Museum of Art | Party of the Century 2014!

    Check out the pictures from The Baltimore Museum of Art's 100th Anniversary Gala!!

    blog.artbma.org/party-of-the-century/

  • Marc Steiner Radio Show Interview 2014

    Marc Steiner Radio Show Interview 2014

    Check out this radio interview with Marc Steiner and come see us at The Transmodern Festival 2014 at Subbasement Gallery

    www.steinershow.org/podcasts/community-…

  • City Paper | Art Review 2014

    City Paper | Art Review 2014

    Check out this great review of the group show "We're all strangers here" by Michael Farley!

    "Corona’s dreamscape is populated by a herd of waist-height furniture/animal hybrids. They’re beautifully crafted from found objects and bones, tied together by wrapped string. This construction method gives the impression that the creatures are bound in place—captives immobilized for unknown intentions. The concepts of passage, boundaries, and captivity are inseparably tied to geopolitics and international borders. Part of what makes this piece so successful is its ability to address sociopolitical issues without sacrificing beauty or mystery. Corona weaves a parable about immigration but allows the audience to fabricate its own narrative, opting for an emotional/aesthetic appeal rather than a heavy-handed didactic tone. Walking on the soft plastic wrappers is pleasurable, but also intimidating—creating the awkward/seductive feeling that comes from touching art in a gallery context that Felix González-Torres mastered. A floodgate of associations with produce, flowers, and the trade relationship between the United States and Latin America is opened when you realize what the objects are. It’s refreshing to see artwork that’s politically relevant without forcing its relevance down your throat. Much of the work at EMP struck the same balance. "

    www.citypaper.com/arts/bcp-magic-8-ball…

  • Maryland Art Place | 30 Under 30 | 2013

    Maryland Art Place | 30 Under 30  | 2013

    Excited to participate in Maryland Art Place 30 Under 30 Talk Series 2013!

    www.mdartplace.org/programs/2013

  • Washington Post | Review Mixtopias 2013

    Washington Post | Review Mixtopias 2013

    'Mixtopias' at Visarts Reviewed in The Washington Post by Mark Jenkins.
    Group show curated by Fletcher Mackey 2013

    www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/…

  • Washington Post | Style Cover | (e)merge 2011

    Washington Post |  Style Cover | (e)merge 2011

    Yes! on the cover of Washington Post Style!!

  • Washington Post | Emerge 2011

    Washington Post | Emerge 2011
  • Radar Redux Interview 2011

    Radar Redux Interview 2011

    Check out this interview with Alexander D'Agostino and I for Radar Redux!

    www.radarredux.com/2011/04/hoesy-corona…